Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 6 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 6 appeared yesterday, the same day as the unveiling of the new openSUSE News portal. And that right after the big announcement that Andreas was handing over the reins of project manager to Coolo. I kinda expected Alpha 6 to be delayed by that latter news. It wasn't and it was a doozy too. The DVD deltaiso was over a one gig in size, so I was expecting some significant changes and improvements this time.

Testing Machine

Coincidently, the day that Alpha 6 was announced was the same day that I received a nice donation of a new (to me) server machine from a friend of tuxmachines. I was wanting to test it and I decided to kill two birds with one stone and install Alpha 6 on it. It consists of a Gigabyte GA-M51GM-S2G mobo, AMD Athlon 64 x2 4200+ cpu, two gig DDR2-667 RAM, on-board Marvell 88E1116 nic, and on-board Geforce 6100 graphics.

Install

The install routine was pretty much unchanged, except I did spot a new item in the package selection. KDE 4 Base System is now listed. openSUSE had done marvelously with the new machine through the other setup routines, but when I chose that KDE 4 Base System it just stopped responding. I left the office and the hour glass for over 15 minutes, but decided it wasn't going any further. I hit reset and decided not to pick KDE 4 this time. I chose the ususal KDE as main desktop, then GNOME at the package selection, as well as C/C++ and Kernel development. At the end of the install, the downloading of release notes was successful. Another new element of the install process was when I was given a short list of online repositories to choose from if I wished to configure then. The one that was pre-selected is the OSS Factory repo, but I was also offered the non-oss repo. I chose it and again the process stopped at the hour glass and no twinkling hard drive indicator. I waited for about 15 minutes before ctrl+F2'in to /sbin/reboot. I cancelled out of that step completely the second time.

System

Package management is one of the major areas of change this release. Developers have been working on it throughout but some big changes happened this past month. With the freeze up during installation configuration, I was left with no repositories. Attempting to set this up manually using the Online Update Configuration didn't finish either. It too just sat there appearing to have stopped responding. Another aspect of the new package management is the elimination of the needing to recache the database each start. However, mine still did, or something that looked like it. After reparsing, it gave me the message that only the installed packages would appear, so apparently it didn't even add the install DVD to the local cache. Also at this point the packages are no longer compatible with YUM or Smart. So, all in all, it is a bit broken this time.

Also upon boot my network card which worked during the install no longer worked. ...or rather, it just wasn't started. However, my connection would come right up when started manually.

No new eye candy (or any change in appearance) was seen this release. However, I believe we will see some next release as I read somewhere about some being added to the factory tree after the creation of Alpha 6.

KDE worked rather well, but GNOME is back on the critical list. Tomboy crashes repetitively at start and the panel never finishes loading. We have desktop icons, the Update applet, and time and date, but no menu or quick launchers.

I had trouble with KDE's mount of removable media as user too. I received the error "the option "flush" is not allowed." I also had trouble ssh'in into or out of Alpha 6, which was a first.

Many of my findings correspond with some of the Most Annoying Bugs:

  • Network setup is broken, needs some manual repair or rcnetwork restart

  • Public key for checking release-notes.rpm is unavailable
  • Registration is broken
  • GNOME is W.I.P.
  • Adding default repositories crashes installation

Some of the new version highlights include:

  • kernel-default-2.6.22-5

  • xorg-x11-7.2-96
  • gcc-4.2-9
  • kdebase3-3.5.7-32
  • qt3-3.3.8-49
  • gnome-desktop-2.19.4-3
  • gtk2-2.11.5-3
  • OpenOffice_org-2.2.99.211-5
  • MozillaFirefox-2.0.0.4-14
  • gimp-2.2.13-90
  • ndiswrapper-1.47-5
  • Full RPM List

Some Changelog Highlights are:

++++ compiz:

- Updated to latest git version (0.5.1_git_xxx) to make compiz compile against
new libwnck.
- New schema system.
- Moved gnome-xgl-info and gnome-xgl-switch back to main package
- gnome-xgl-info and gnome-xgl-switch reside in /usr/bin now.

++++ kdebase3:

- update from 3.5 branch to include bugfixes

++++ perl-Crypt-SSLeay:

- version update to 0.56

++++ wine:

- Upgraded to upstream 0.9.41

++++ glibc:

- Update to head of glibc-2.6 branch.

++++ flash-player:

- update to 9.0.48.0

++++ Full Changelog

All told this release is kinda broken, but it is an alpha. You have to break a few eggs to make a souffl'e, and hopefully it won't fall next release. This is the first release for which Coolo took responsibility, but he came along late in the game. Let's hang this one on Andreas. (jk) Actually, Coolo is said to have stated that this is the first alpha to feel like an alpha. Well, I don't know about that.

Network problems lead to rash judgement?

I think most of your criticisms, whilst valid, derive only from a failure to properly install and configure drivers for your network card (during the install process). Whilst this doesn't help yourself, I don't think this should lead us to write off this distro as 'broken'.

re: Network problems lead to rash judgement?

The network connection was barely mentioned alongside the other half dozen or so broken or malfunctioning systems. But it's an alpha, it's supposed to be broken. Big Grin

Give her (and us) a break

winchuff wrote:
I think most of your criticisms, whilst valid, derive only from a failure to properly install and configure drivers for your network card (during the install process).

In an alpha release, you'd expect for there to be some show-stopping bugs. "Network setup is broken" and "Adding default repositories crashes installation" are both enough to tell you that this is....an alpha release.

winchuff wrote:
I don't think this should lead us to write off this distro as 'broken'.

Obviously, openSUSE as a distro isn't broken. Nobody said that. This alpha release, however, is. That's why it's....an alpha release.

re: openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 6 Report

I've tried it too, i thought i might as well give the new one cd installation a try while i'm at it... (big mistake)

i'm a gnome lover, so i chose the gnome 2.19 CD despite the W.I.P warning that coolo gave us, i just have to learn the hard way, if i wasn't like that, life would be too easy for me to handle. what i found was that THE WHOLE FREAKIN SYSTEM IS BROKEN, you can't add repos with the new zypper (if you used yast it will hang, and if you used zypper CL it will JUST not work) and, of course, no sound, no control center or gnome-main-menu (SUSE menu) for gnome, half of the applets are not working, gdm is broken, blah, blah, blah...

the only thing i did get working was 'smart' - after manually downloading and installing it from the factory repo, i thought maybe i could fix the system by updating faulty packages and installing the missing dependencies, but no, that would have been too easy (and we don't want that)

so i gave up..

i know it's an alpha and all, but as far as i know it's supposed to be the last one, i mean the former alphas were far more stable than this, we're supposed to be heading forward, not falling down on our asses, or am i making a big fuss about nothing? i don't know, i just can't let myself be more assed about it, i just installed the new compiz-fusion along with the new screenlets-0.8, and i just wanna say "MACs, watch out!" Tongue

re: SUSE 10.3 ALPHA 6

You'd a thunk that by now - almost everyone would understand WHAT ALPHA MEANS?

Apparently not.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Intel: HEVC, ANV Vulkan Driver, Linux 5.7 and New Security Hole

  • Intel Adds VA-API Acceleration For HEVC REXT To FFmpeg

    Intel open-source developers have contributed support for VA-API acceleration of HEVC REXT "Range Extensions" content with the widely-used FFmpeg library. HEVC Range Extensions are extensions to H.265 geared for areas of content distribution, medical imaging, still imaging, and more. Among the changes with HEVC REXT are supporting 4:2:2 and 4:4:4 chroma sampling formats. HEVC Range Extensions are laid out in much more detail in this IEEE.org paper.

  • Intel Boosts Gen7 GPU Vulkan Compute Performance By ~330% For Geekbench

    Intel's open-source "ANV" Vulkan driver for Linux doesn't see much attention for pre-Broadwell hardware but today it saw a big improvement for Vulkan compute on aging Gen7 Ivybridge/Haswell era hardware. Jason Ekstrand, the lead developer of the Intel ANV Vulkan driver, discovered that in their driver's pipeline code the data cache functionality would end up being disabled when a shader was pulled out of the pipeline cache. For Broadwell/Gen8+ the data cache bit was being ignored but this oversight ended up having huge implications for Gen7 Intel graphics hardware (Ivybridge/Haswell) as the oldest supported by Intel's Vulkan driver.

  • Intel Has Accumulated 400+ Graphics Driver Patches So Far For Linux 5.7

    Intel just sent out their initial pull request of new feature changes/improvements to DRM-Next that in turn is for landing in about one month's time when the Linux 5.7 merge window kicks off. With taking longer than usual to send in their first round of feature updates, this first of several pull requests already amounts to over 400 patches. While it is a big pull request given the extra time for patches to accumulate, there aren't too many user-facing changes. Though there is a lot of enablement work for Tiger Lake as well as continuing Gen11 Ice Lake and Elkhart Lake work. For Ice Lake / Elkhart Lake there are a number of driver workarounds added. For Gen12 / Tiger Lake there are workarounds, display fixes, RPS is re-enabled, and other work.

  • Intel KVM Virtualization Hit By Vulnerability Over Unfinished Code

    At least not another hardware vulnerability, but CVE-2020-2732 appears to stem from unfinished code within the Intel VMX code for the Linux kernel's Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) support. CVE-2020-2732 as of writing isn't yet public but we've been closely monitoring it since seeing a peculiar patch series earlier today and not finding much information on it.

Hardware and Devices for GNU/Linux

Screenshots/Audiocasts/Shows: Netrunner 20.01, Linux Headlines, This Week in Linux and Pandas

  • Netrunner 20.01 – Twenty Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Netrunner 20.01 – Twenty.

  • 2020-02-25 | Linux Headlines

    Manjaro hits version 19, Firefox starts rolling out DNS over HTTPS by default in the US, Puppet releases version 2 of Bolt, and Mirantis commits to the future of Docker Swarm.

  • This Week in Linux 94: Mesa 20, PipeWire, Linux Be Scary, MyPaint, GTK, Microsoft Defender

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new releases from core projects like Mesa & PipeWire and we also got some App News from MyPaint, GTK and a new convergent apps project called Maui. Then we’ll check out some distro news regarding the Untangle Firewall and some Red Hat news about CoreOS Container Linux. Later in the show, we’ll cover some really interesting news from Nvidia about Ray Tracing to Vulkan. Someone in the UK Police thought it was a good idea to warn parents their kids may become hackers and Microsoft announced their Microsoft Defender is coming to Linux. Then we’ll round out the show with some great deals for Games, Books and Comics from Humble Bundle. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Data School: How to merge DataFrames in pandas (video)

    In my new pandas video, you're going to learn how to use the "merge" function so that you can combine multiple datasets into a single DataFrame. Merging (also known as "joining") can be tricky to do correctly, which is why I'll walk you through the process in great detail. By the end of the video, you'll be fully prepared to merge your own DataFrames!

Events: LibOCon, CHAOSScon, SUSE in Paris, Open Networking & Edge Summit North America 2020

  • LibreOffice Conference 2021 Call for Locations

    Once a year, the LibreOffice Community gathers for a global community event: the LibreOffice Conference, or LibOCon. After a series of successful events – Paris, October 2011; Berlin, October 2012; Milan, September 2013; Bern, September 2014; Aarhus, September 2015; Brno, September 2016; Rome, October 2017; Tirana, September 2018 and Almeria, September 2019 – the venue for 2020 is Nuremberg, Germany. To ease the organization, TDF Board of Directors has decided to open the call for location for 2021 earlier this year, to give the 2021 event organizers the opportunity of attending the conference in Nurembers in October 2020. The LibreOffice Conference takes place between September and November, with a preference for September. The deadline for sending in proposals is June 30, 2019. After receiving the applications, we will evaluate if all pre-conditions have been met and the overall content of the proposal, and give all applicants a chance to answer questions and clarify details if needed.

  • CHAOSScon EU 2020: play by play

    This is my second time attending CHAOSScon. I attended on behalf of RIT LibreCorps to represent our engagement with the UNICEF Office of Innovation and the Innovation Fund. For CHAOSScon EU 2020, I arrived hoping to learn more about effective metric collection strategies for open source communities and also get a deeper understanding of the technology behind GrimoireLab.

  • When in Paris, learn how SUSE empowers DevOps teams with HPE

    We will be there (Booth #21) to meet with Presales Consultants and Solution Architects from both HPE and Partners and chat about how we are working with HPE to deliver software-defined infrastructure with an open approach.

  • Keynote Speakers Announced For Open Networking & Edge Summit North America 2020

    The open networking event has now been expanded to cover Edge Computing, Edge Cloud and IoT. The event focuses on collaborative development and innovation across enterprises, service providers/telcos and cloud providers to shape the future of networking and edge computing with a deep focus on technical, architectural and business discussions in the areas of Open Networking & AI/ML-enabled use cases.