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Nokia N800 gains a Mozilla-based browser

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Software

A Mozilla-based web browser is available for Nokia's Linux-based N800 Internet tablet. The "MicroB" browser was released last night, by the Nokia-sponsored Maemo community that maintains open source software stacks for Nokia's tablets.

The MicroB browser is based on Gecko 1.9, the same fairly hefty rendering engine that will power Firefox 3.0, when it is released. Thus, MicroB could work with some complex web page features that the lightweight Opera browser does not support-- Google maps, for example, according to the project's website.

Standards supported by MicroB reportedly include:

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