Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Mint: Ubuntu on Steroids

Filed under
Ubuntu

To begin with this review, I have to say that before running Linux Mint, I had already used two other Linux distros. Then I saw a great Linux time line and there was a distro called Linux Mint which forked from Ubuntu. I had a look at their website and it was looking good, so I downloaded Linux Mint 3.0 codename Cassandra.

Setting it up
Installation was pretty easy, and went on the same way as Ubuntu’s. I didn’t dig too much to see what it looked like from the LiveCD, because I want too see if it on my hard drive. Boot loader detected my Vista the same way Ubuntu did too. No surprises here.
Step one: update.
Easy as hell, just like Ubuntu: I got the list, it updated and rebooted.
Step two: graphics driver.
Here I noticed the first difference: instead of getting the old nvidia-glx, Mint comes packed with Envy, a tool that allows you to automatically download the bleeding edge driver for your nVidia or ATi card. However, I had the color depth issue that Ubuntu had already brought me, so I ran ‘nvidia-xconfig --add-argb-glx-visuals -d 24‘ and rebooted.
Step three: Beryl.

More Here.




More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18 Final

Red Hat News

Is Canonical the Victim of High Expectations?

When Ubuntu was new, those who questioned it were mostly Debian developers, disgruntled because they were not hired or because Ubuntu failed to acknowledge its debt to Debian. Today, however, a vocal minority seems to view Canonical Software, the company behind Ubuntu, as a Microsoft in the making. From being the uncritical darling of open source, Canonical is closely and cynically scrutinized, and its motives constantly questioned. So how did this transformation happen? Suspicion about corporations is hardly new in open source, yet Canonical seems singled out in a way that SUSE or Red Hat only occasionally are. Read more

Permabit offers deduplication to Linux masses – almost

Permabit has moved beyond OEMs, making the latest release of its dedupe technology available as a Linux software package so that ISVs, professional services folks and systems integrators in its Hybrid Cloud Professional Services partners programme can use it. Previously it was available to OEMs in Albireo (dedupe) and Virtual Data Optimizer or Virtual Data Optimizer, VDO (dedupe+compression+thin provisioning) form. VDO v6 is designed for the cloud service provider market, Permabit says, and the VDO for Hybrid Cloud package simplifies VDO installation and configuration in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) data centres. Read more