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What CIOs should know about the open source revolution

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OSS

What should CIOs know about the open source revolution?

Julie Hanna Farris: CIOs should know that open source is not a passing fad. Open source has forever changed the software industry and is leading the way into a new era. It is changing the fundamentals of how organizations evaluate, purchase and deploy information systems.

Why will the open source revolution have staying power?

Farris: At it's most basic level, the open source revolution is about freedom and choice. The revolution has been fueled by the collective backlash against vendor lock-in. For CIOs, it means freedom from technology and licensing lock-in by any single vendor. The open source revolution also represents a shift in the balance of power back to customers, giving them greater control over their destiny. This is good for customers and for the industry overall. Customers have greater leverage with their suppliers, while vendors are forced to stay nimble and innovative to compete.

How is it transforming enterprise IT today?

Farris: Open source is accelerating the commoditization of technology and the adoption of open standards. We are seeing a shift away from monolithic, proprietary architectures to highly modular computing based on open systems and standards.

The result will be a highly interoperable IT infrastructure that allows customers to plug 'n play best of breed components. In essence, open source leads to greater flexibility and choice at all levels of the IT stack.

How will it transform enterprise IT in the future?

Full Story.

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