Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu Studio supports serious audio, adds little for video and graphics

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Studio bills itself as the "multimedia creation flavor of Ubuntu," an official Ubuntu project "aimed at the GNU/Linux audio, video, and graphic enthusiast as well as professional." It is certainly flashy on the outside -- even if it is mostly the same Ubuntu Linux distro under the hood.

Ubuntu Studio's first release is 7.04 -- the release number indicating that it is built on top of standard Ubuntu 7.04, although it was in fact released later, at the end of May. This version is available only for 32-bit Intel architecture. You can install it by downloading the DVD ISO image, or you can convert an existing Ubuntu 7.04 installation into Ubuntu Studio by adding the project's APT repository.
That repository gives you access to a dozen or so new packages -- some containing just a single application (such as the digital recording suite Ardour), and some containing multiple tools.

Because of its non-free status, video editing app Cinelerra is available through a separate individually-hosted repository -- at least such is the plan. I never got the repository to work, nor the parent domain to respond to HTTP queries.

More Here.




More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

An Early Look at Ubuntu Dock for GNOME Shell in Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark)

Ubuntu 17.10, the next major release of the widely-used Ubuntu Linux OS, will be transitioning to the GNOME Shell user interface by default instead of the Unity desktop environment that was used until now. Read more

SteamOS vs. Ubuntu vs. Windows 10: Which Is The Best Operating System For Gaming?

Steam will continue to support Linux as we’ve seen on previous occasions, but other hardware companies should also lend a helping hand. This will include the likes of Intel, AMD, NVIDIA and others which control the driver stack. If it took decades for Linux to improve heavily, then we should not ruin your expectations a tad bit because it will take several more years to further reduce that performance gap between Windows 10 and the latter. However, the fact that Linux is getting there should mean that Microsoft has something to worry. Read more

Linux-based postmarketOS project aims to give smartphones a 10-year lifecycle

The folks behind postmarketOS want to go even further: they’re developing a Linux-based alternative to Android with the goal of providing up to 10 years of support for old smartphones. That’s the goal anyway. Right now the developers have only taken the first steps. Read more