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yum! raspBerry 0.60

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Berry Linux is a livecd based on Fedora Core with updates and Japanese language support. Version 0.60 was released today utilizing a 2.6.12 kernel, kde 3.4.1, OpenOffice.org 2.0(beta) and gcc 4.0. ...and a cute kitty cat wallpaper.



Berry Linux has a wonderful initial boot screen screen featuring everyone's favorite bird, penguins! Fortunately for me, available is an option for the English Language. The booting splash is very attractive introducing the berry motiff. This appetizing theme runs through the entire boot process while the hardware detection does it's thing seting up all devices and initial configurations quite quickly and accurately.



    

    



Berry boots straight into kde 3.4.1 as the user 'berry' and one is greeted by an attractive desktop setup. It appears to be a slimmed down version not even including kmail, instead opting for the mozilla mail client. Mozilla appears to be the default browser as well, although konqueror is included. The fonts are nice looking and transparency is enabled for the menus for a nice effect. Fluxbox is also available.

The menus themselves are quite scaled down and highly customized to contain available apps and easy access to the different Berry configurations and options. Also included in the menu is an entry for a hard drive installer, a few media apps, and games. The complete OpenOffice.org suite is also available in the form of the 2.0 Beta. Not only that, but as a pleasant surprise one can find the free versions of the TextMaker writer and spreadsheet applications, labeled (disappointingly) Word and Excel. I really like Textmaker and use it on my laptop for its small footprint and low resource demand.

On the desktop one finds the usual suspects. Present are icons for Computer, Documents, Network Places, Web Browser, Mail, Media Player, and Konsole.

Under the hood one finds the Redhat init and rpm package handling. The kernel version is 2.6.12-b2 yet Berry is still utilizing the devfs. They have chosen to go with gcc-4.0.0-8, glibc-2.3.5-10, and qt-3.3.4-15.1. Full list of rpms is here.

Overall I found Berry Linux to be a worthy contender and imagine for those requiring the Japanese language support, it must be a Godsend. It seemed stable and quite complete for a 464mb download. The only problems encountered was the Simple Instant Messenger that didn't open upon clicking the menu entry, the cd player (xmms) couldn't see my audio cds and some of the keybindings were inaccurate. I encourage everyone to try at least a little taste of Berry. Yum.

Screenshots.

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