Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

yum! raspBerry 0.60

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Berry Linux is a livecd based on Fedora Core with updates and Japanese language support. Version 0.60 was released today utilizing a 2.6.12 kernel, kde 3.4.1, OpenOffice.org 2.0(beta) and gcc 4.0. ...and a cute kitty cat wallpaper.



Berry Linux has a wonderful initial boot screen screen featuring everyone's favorite bird, penguins! Fortunately for me, available is an option for the English Language. The booting splash is very attractive introducing the berry motiff. This appetizing theme runs through the entire boot process while the hardware detection does it's thing seting up all devices and initial configurations quite quickly and accurately.



    

    



Berry boots straight into kde 3.4.1 as the user 'berry' and one is greeted by an attractive desktop setup. It appears to be a slimmed down version not even including kmail, instead opting for the mozilla mail client. Mozilla appears to be the default browser as well, although konqueror is included. The fonts are nice looking and transparency is enabled for the menus for a nice effect. Fluxbox is also available.

The menus themselves are quite scaled down and highly customized to contain available apps and easy access to the different Berry configurations and options. Also included in the menu is an entry for a hard drive installer, a few media apps, and games. The complete OpenOffice.org suite is also available in the form of the 2.0 Beta. Not only that, but as a pleasant surprise one can find the free versions of the TextMaker writer and spreadsheet applications, labeled (disappointingly) Word and Excel. I really like Textmaker and use it on my laptop for its small footprint and low resource demand.

On the desktop one finds the usual suspects. Present are icons for Computer, Documents, Network Places, Web Browser, Mail, Media Player, and Konsole.

Under the hood one finds the Redhat init and rpm package handling. The kernel version is 2.6.12-b2 yet Berry is still utilizing the devfs. They have chosen to go with gcc-4.0.0-8, glibc-2.3.5-10, and qt-3.3.4-15.1. Full list of rpms is here.

Overall I found Berry Linux to be a worthy contender and imagine for those requiring the Japanese language support, it must be a Godsend. It seemed stable and quite complete for a 464mb download. The only problems encountered was the Simple Instant Messenger that didn't open upon clicking the menu entry, the cd player (xmms) couldn't see my audio cds and some of the keybindings were inaccurate. I encourage everyone to try at least a little taste of Berry. Yum.

Screenshots.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Software: Grafana, Heaptrack, Vim

  • Grafana – An Open Source Software for Analytics and Monitoring
    Grafana is an open source, feature rich, powerful, elegant and highly-extensible analytics and monitoring software that runs on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It is a de facto software for data analytics, being used at Stack Overflow, eBay, PayPal, Uber and Digital Ocean – just to mention but a few. It supports 30+ open source as well as commercial databases/data sources including MySQL, PostgreSQL, Graphite, Elasticsearch, OpenTSDB, Prometheus and InfluxDB. It allows you to dig deeply into large volumes of real-time, operational data; visualize, query, set alerts and get insights from your metrics from differen
  • Heaptrack v1.1.0 release
    Better memory profiling on Linux After more than a year of work, I’m pleased to release another version of heaptrack, the Linux memory profiler! The new version 1.1.0 comes with some new features, significant performance improvements and – most importantly – much improved stability and correctness. If you have tried version v1.0 in the past and encountered problems, update to the new v1.1 and try again!
  • Ten Years of Vim
     

    The philosophy behind Vim takes a while to sink in: While other editors focus on writing as the central part of working with text, Vim thinks it's editing.

     

    You see, most of the time I don't spend writing new text; instead, I edit existing text.

  •  

GNU/Linux: Parrot 4.0, Oregan, Containers and Linux 4.18 Plans

  • Parrot 4.0 is out
    Parrot 4.0 has been released. Parrot is a security-oriented distribution aimed at penetration tests and digital forensics analysis, with additional tools to preserve privacy.
  • Parrot 4.0 release notes
  • Oregan launches SparQ middleware for Linux and Android TV
    Oregan said that the open standards-based offering resolves the differences between the current security and performance requirements of modern-day TV services and the hardware capabilities of STBs that were deployed up to a decade ago.
  • Linux app support coming to older Chrome OS devices
    Linux apps on Chrome OS is one of the biggest developments for the OS since Android apps. Previous reports stated Chromebooks with certain kernel versions would be left in the dust, but the Chrome OS developers have older devices on the roadmap, too. When Google first broke silence on Linux app functionality, it was understood that Linux kernel 4.4 was required to run apps due to dependencies on newer kernel modules. Thanks to an issue found on Chromium’s public bugtracker, we have confirmation that containers won’t be limited to the handful of Chrome OS devices released with kernel 4.4.
  • Looking Ahead To The Linux 4.18 Kernel
    There still are several weeks to go until the Linux 4.17 kernel will be officially released and for that to initiate the Linux 4.18 merge window, but we already know some of the features coming to this next kernel cycle as well as an idea for some other work that may potentially land.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers