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Yahoo Firefox toolbar reaches Mac and Linux

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Moz/FF

Yahoo has started offering a beta version of its toolbar for the open source browser Firefox on Apple Mac OS X and Linux.

The Firefox version of the Yahoo toolbar, which includes extended bookmarking and anti-spyware features, has been available on Microsoft Windows since February. Before then, the toolbar was only available for Microsoft's Internet Explorer (IE).

Earlier this month, Google released a beta version of its toolbar for Firefox users on Windows, Linux and Mac. The Google Toolbar, which provides features such as spellchecking and translation, has been available on IE for more than four years.

The availability of such applications on Firefox is further evidence of the growing importance of the open source browser. Over the last year Firefox has taken a significant proportion of the browser market from IE, obtaining more than 10 percent of it in some countries.

Full Story.

Big whoop

Can't believe anyone is dumb enough to clutter up their browswer with a toolbar, any toolbar. How hard is it to book mark Google or Yahoo or whoever and click on that when you need to go to their site.

It's like those linux fanboys that take up 1/2 their desktop displaying their system stats - semi transparently of course (oh no, by system swap space is up 2.48754% and my power supply fan rpm has dropped 9 rpm's since the last time I looked - which was 1.45 minutes ago - best go recompile something).

Too many people confuse looking busy with being busy.

I figured out the reason for this phenomenon

Boys will play with toys. I believe once the honeymoon between user and Linux is over...a more sensible desktop environment emerges. However, I do wonder if being a prisoner of MS for years and years, not being given the "toys" to play with outside of some very buggy third party programs, doesn't have something to do with it. "We're Microsoft. Dont like what we offer...? Eat Poop."

No I fired you and now use Linux. You eat "poop".

Let the people play. my browser would be "bloated" by your standards. I visit over 400 web pages a day and my catagorized bookmark toolbar saves me hours of work a week. I use a very good program called TuxCards to keep my notes and blogs/paid articles indexed. Guess what, that sits in my custom toolbar and I don't have to dig for it to get to it when I need it.

Expending several mouse clicks and looking thru menus to find one link out of thousands is silly when you can have it one click away.

Being busy can indeed look very busy.

helios

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