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Wolvix 1.1.0 Mini-Review & Screenshots

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Wolvix is a Linux distribution released as an installable liveCD. Originally based on Slax, it is now built upon Slackware and seems to concentrate highly on multimedia. It features XFCE4 and Fluxbox and comes with a large suite of software. Version 1.1.0 was released a few days ago and comes in two variations. Hunter is the traditional more complete version, while Cub is a smaller edition designed to fit and run on 256MB USB Flash Drives. I've been a fan of Wolvix since the beginning because of it's unique look and feel while offering exceptional functionality and lots of useful applications. Realizing that I haven't looked at it in a while, I decided to give Wolvix 1.1.0 a little spin this weekend. Since on-disk beat me to the punch, I'll just post a mini-review and my screenshots.

Since my last foray, Wolvix has new bootloader and boot splashes. Both tasteful and understated, they are a welcome addition that brings a sense of professionalism to the distro. The Wolvix liveCD boots really quickly, with any number of options the user may wish (see the F menus for details). Providing consistancy, Wolvix now has a graphical login within the same motiff as well as a customized XFCE splash that displays the progress against the login backdrop. This handsome treatment makes for a pleasing first impression.

The mood created by the boot process isn't lost upon login. It continues into the XFCE4 and Fluxbox desktop environments with the silhouette of a lonely wolf perched upon a hilltop against the dark night sky howling at a crescent moon. I can imagine it's a metaphor for Linux developers as they toil at their keyboards in their solitary pursuits at 3:am in the morning.

Beyond the aesthetics one finds an amazing plethora of useful applications. Although there is a emphasis on multimedia enjoyment, other areas are no way neglected. In the menus one finds all manner of applications for the various computer tasks, whether it be work or play. From office apps to games, there's something for everyone. It also has lots of system tools, graphical package manager, Wolvix Control Center, and ultra-friendly hard drive installer.

I was quite impressed with the hardware support given my laptop by Wolvix. Ndiswrapper was available and allowed me to use my winnic to connect to the internet. My touchpad worked responsively and accurately. Sound worked out of the box, including the volume buttons over my keyboard. There didn't seem to be an "nv" Xorg module, but vesa worked well until I installed the available NVIDIA proprietary drivers through Gslapt. Afterwhich, I was able to achieve the screen resolution I prefer. I could enable cpu scaling and could monitor battery life through proc files.

Wolvix just keeps improving and this release is their best yet. Wolvix still remains one of my favorite Linux distributions.

Going against the "lone wolf" persona, Wolvix has a nice home at wolvix.org with an active and helpful forum.

Download or Purchase Wolvix 1.1.0.

My Screenshots.

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