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Inside KDE - The Trash System

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KDE

In KDE there are a wide number of very visible and useful applications that people use every day. However, there's also a lot more that are there that people don't know about. Some of these are ubiquitous elements of the OS, while others are useful applications placed there to help you do a wide variety of things, yet aren't well known. We've already covered some of these in our "The Lesser Apps of KDE" series where we went through the Kmenu and showed you the goldmine of lesser known apps that are available there for you to use in hopes that you would both make use of them, and find them useful. In this article series we plan to dig a little deeper and bring out a lot of other great things about KDE you may not know about, and it won't be just programs either.

In our first article today, we're going to look at KDE's trash system. For those who hadn't paid attention to the trash system in KDE (hey, who does?), sometime during the move from KDE 2.x to 3.x, or sometime thereafter, KDE moved its trash system from a live trash file storage system to a representative trash file system. While that may seem important to some, others might question why this is important. I'm sure if you're concentrating on the big picture only, something as little as this wouldn't be of any interest to you. But take this into consideration. What's one thing you take for granted every day?

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