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People of openSUSE: Pascal Bleser

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Interviews
SUSE

Today ‘People of openSUSE’ starts. This project aims to make the people behind the openSUSE project and the distribution more visible. Therefore there will be several interviews with different contributors published on news.opensuse.org.

If you for example always wanted to know what a specific contributer motivates to participate or what he thinks about the future of the openSUSE project and of course if he turns off his computer during a thunderstorm as well as a few more non openSUSE related facts - just keep on reading the ‘People of openSUSE’ interviews that will be published in the future.

Now let’s start with Pascal Bleser:

When and why did you start using openSUSE/SUSE Linux?
I jumped on the S.u.S.E. bandwagon with version 5.0, which is quite old and that was in.. umm…1997 I think. Before that, I used Slackware and Redhat a little.

When did you join the openSUSE community and what made you do that?
At some point, when I was already using SUSE Linux, I got really interested in packaging RPMs.

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People of openSUSE: Stephan Kulow

I started using computers only when linux was available. It wasn’t exactly my choice, but when I grew up having a computer in the house wasn’t part of the culture. Today I have two computers in my living room alone. Ok, one is named game console and one is named sat receiver - they are both computes though and one of them runs linux.

When and why did you start using openSUSE/SUSE Linux?
I used the very first SUSE Linux versions < 5. Then I used Debian and later Caldera OpenLinux. When I started to work for SUSE, it didn’t take long before I switched. So it must have been around 2003. I think that was SL 8.1.

When did you join the openSUSE community and what made you do that?
I don’t think I have a good answer to that question. I joined the openSUSE community the moment we opened the development because I thought it’s important.

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