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EMC unveils largest corporate data storage machine

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EMC Corp. will unveil on Monday the largest ever machine for storing corporate data, with up to four times more capacity than is now available.

The world's top supplier of corporate data storage wants to stoke growth for its high-capacity systems, betting that huge appetite for data from its biggest customers will defy a trend toward mid-sized boxes, in which users add storage as required.

"Demand is nearly limitless at EMC's biggest customers for ever more massive machines," said Steve Duplissie, an analyst with Enterprise Strategy Group near Boston.

"There always appears to be somebody who needs these absurdly large boxes."

Target customers are the world's largest companies, Wall Street trading firms, telecoms carriers and government agencies.

EMC said its new Symmetrix DMX-3 is the first corporate machine that can hold more than a petabyte -- over a quadrillion bytes of data, or enough to store 2 trillion telephone company transaction records or 250 million digital songs.

In the industry's most anticipated news about new products this year, the Hopkinton, Massachusetts-based company said it would unveil the seventh generation of its high-capacity systems used by big organizations to store reams of corporate data.

"This allows customers to do more while also reducing their costs," said Dave Donatelli, EMC's executive vice president in charge of storage hardware.


International Business Machines Corp. and Hitachi Ltd.'s Hitachi Data Systems unit are EMC's main rivals in the high end of the market for dedicated storage equipment -- not including data stored on computers themselves.

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