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Novell's Victory Over SCO Could Have Downside For Linux Users

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Linux

The free software world spent the weekend celebrating after a judge nixed SCO's ownership claims over Unix and, by extension, Linux. But the ruling did not specifically address SCO's charge that Linux is a Unix knock off--and a case that could have settled that question for good may now fade away as a result of Friday's decision.

Kimball has asked both IBM and SCO to submit memos summarizing where they believe the case stands in the aftermath of Friday's SCO v. Novell ruling. It seems likely the action will be dropped: After all, how can SCO continue suing IBM for stepping on rights that SCO doesn't own?

Linux backers are reacting with glee to all of this news. An anonymous blogger who goes by the name 'Pamela Jones' on the anti-SCO Web site Groklaw said over the weekend that he or she would "eat chocolate" to celebrate Novell's victory.

But hold the Godiva and Toblerone for a moment. If I'm a Linux user, do I really want SCO v. IBM to be called off without a definitive ruling on SCO's claims?

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Novell vs SCO Linux downside debunked and shredded

In response to Paul McDougall's article in Information Week, "Novell's Victory Over SCO Could Have Downside For Linux Users" and other such fud, Groklaw's Pamela Jones has published an overwhelming rebuttal.

Given that PJ has been mostly right all along about the SCO vs IBM and SCO vs Novell litigation, this carefully reasoned analysis evicerates these newly appearing fud articles.

Interested folks can read it here.

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