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People Behind KDE » Thiago Macieira

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KDE

A SHORT INTRO

Name: Thiago Macieira
Located in: São Paulo, Brazil
Profession: Telecom Engineer, working as a Business Consultant
Nickname on IRC: thiago
Homepage: http://developer.kde.org/~thiago/
Blog: http://www.kdedevelopers.org/blog/100

THE INTERVIEW

In what ways do you make a contribution to KDE?

I develop some code in kdelibs (mostly libkdecore) and I am currently the maintainer of the low-level networking code. I have also contributed to the ioslaves, as an extension of my own networking framework, and a bit regarding encodings/Unicode-issues. The application I watch most closely is Kopete, which is probably the most visible application in kdenetwork, at least now that KMail has left us for kdepim. However, I don't consider myself a Kopete developer: I merely follow the development and try to give input to the actual developers (who are, by the way, doing a great job).

Full Interview.

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