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UK AWE adopts Open Source Systems

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The UK Atomic Weapons Establishment plc (AWE) is using a visualization cluster system based on open source software. The cluster is adopted for research activities into new techniques for visualizing data produced by computer simulation facilities. The company Linux Networx is responsible for the development and insertion of the system.

AWE is a major part of the United Kingdom’s nuclear defence activities and is dependent on the use of large scale computer simulation. For this field of operation, high performance systems are required. The new cluster systems are based on 64-bit processors and PCI Express interfaces able to provide the needed performance.

“Visualization and Linux Clusters have moved on in the last few years, and nowadays visualization technologies have to address more performance requirements than before. This includes large memory, 64-bit addressing, low latency interconnect, Open Source and the most recent development – a mature system management environment. These were some of the leading factors behind AWE’s choice of Linux Networx,” said David Ball, group leader at AWE.

Source.

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