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SIMILE Exhibit: Data publishing for the rest of us

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Tools like phpMyEdit allow you to create a quick-and-dirty front end to a database, but what if you need to publish a spreadsheet or BibTeX file on your Web site and give your visitors the ability to dynamically sort, filter, group, and visualize the published data? For that, you can turn to SIMILE Exhibit, an impressive data publishing framework that uses plain old HTML, CSS, and a bit of JavaScript to create Web pages with support for sorting, filtering, and data visualization. Exhibit requires neither database nor server-side coding wizardry, and you can master the tool in no time, even if you don't have any programming experience.

SIMILE Exhibit stores data in the JSON format, so you must convert your data source into a JSON data file before you let Exhibit work on it. The format is pretty straightforward; you can figure out its inner workings by just looking at it.

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