Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

First Windows Vista Beta Could Ship Wednesday

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft is poised to ship an early beta version of its newly re-christened Vista operating system to its key developers as early as Wednesday, according to reports circulating throughout the industry.

Microsoft spokesmen reached by TechWeb declined to confirm or deny the reports.

Last Friday, when Microsoft publicly announced "Vista" as the official name for the OS which had previously been code-named "Longhorn," it said it would ship its first beta release to developers by August 3.

There's speculation that Microsoft may have edged that date forward to capitalize on attention focused on a meeting for financial analysts the company is holding at its Redmond, Wash., headquarters on Thursday.

"Microsoft is having its financial analysts meeting on Thursday and it's always good to show Wall Street some progress," said Joe Wilcox, a senior analyst at Jupiter Research, who added he has no advance knowledge of the company's plans. "It would be very advantageous for Microsoft to be able to release the beta for the Thursday meeting."

Initial reports about the prospective July 27 beta release first surfaced last Friday on ActiveWin.com, a Windows-enthusiast Web site.

Whether the Vista beta is unveiled on Wednesday or seven days later on August 3 won't much change the perception that the operating system will come to market later than Microsoft had originally hoped. "If you start the clock today, it seems like they're on track; if you go back three or four years, they're way behind what they were hoping to do" said Dwight Davis, an analyst at market researchers Summit Strategies in Seattle. Davis added that he didn't have any knowledge about the timing of the beta release. "I don't think the market has been up in arms over the delay. I don't think there's been any drumbeat of demand for Vista and, in fact, Microsoft still has a fairly uphill battle in marketing this and making the case that it's worth the upgrade."

By Alexander Wolfe
TechWeb News

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

Fedora: The Latest

  • Fedora Ambassadors: Communicating about Design
    This week is busy and continues to keep the pace of previous weeks. A lot has happened this week in the Fedora Project and I’ve taken on a few new tasks too. In addition to existing work on Google Summer of Code, Community Operations, Marketing, and more, I wanted to take some time this week to focus on CommOps Ticket #71. This ticket originally focused on improving accessibility of design resources for Fedora Ambassadors. However, after an interesting conversation with Máirín Duffy on the Design Team workflow, I discovered the availability was not the main issue. Instead, it seemed like communicating was an area needing focus.
  • Investigating Python
    I have been trying to implement private projects on Pagure, while doing that I was struggling with certain design of a function and while doing that I constantly have to switch between shell, editor and at times browser.
  • When is a kernel bug not a kernel bug?
    Think of this scenario: You're sitting at your shiny Fedora install and notice a kernel update is available. You get all excited, update it through dnf or Gnome Software, or whatever you use, reboot and then things stop working. "STUPID KERNEL UPDATE WHY DID YOU BREAK MY MACHINE" you might say. Clearly it's at fault, so you dutifully file a bug against the kernel (you do that instead of just complaining, right?). Then you get told it isn't a kernel problem, and you probably think the developers are crazy. How can a kernel update that doesn't work NOT be a kernel problem?
  • Notes on PXE booting with Fedora
    The typical method of installing Fedora on a desktop distribution is via some physical media (CD/DVD once upon a time, USB sticks these days). Fedora also supports PXE boot installation. I ended up doing a PXE install for some recent hardware that was shipped to me as that was the best supported method. The Fedora instructions are good but I still ran into a few hiccups. These are my notes which might be useful for others (or be wrong, YMMV). This was also a UEFI only setup.
  • UEFI virt roms now in official Fedora repos
    Kamil got to it first, but just a note that UEFI roms for x86 and aarch64 virt are now shipped in the standard Fedora repos, where previously the recommended place to grab them was an external nightly repo. Kamil has updated the UEFI+QEMU wiki page to reflect this change.
  • Fedora Design Suite considered “best of the basics”
    Do-it-yourself site MakeUseOf recently highlighted Fedora Design Suite from their article “6 Linux Distros Designed for Artists, Musicians and Editors“. They also called the Fedora Design Suite as the “best of the basics”.

Red Hat News