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Why Sabayon isn’t Gentoo

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Linux
Gentoo

Sabayon is considered ‘close’ to Gentoo, but not necessarily ‘very close’ (atleast in my view). The reason for this is because Sabayon uses its own versions of some pretty major packages (browsing through their overlay, I see packages like grub, xorg-x11 and xorg-server to name just a few).

The problem is not that we (the Gentoo community) don’t want to provide official support, it’s that we can’t (beyond a certain point). Sabayon provides its own version of many packages and these seem to (sometimes) lag behind the official Gentoo tree. A case in example: The other day someone came into #gentoo complaining that nvidia-drivers wouldn’t install with glibc-2.6. Glibc-2.6 no longer includes the nptl and nptl-only USE flags, but the Sabayon package was still looking for them. There’s nothing the Gentoo developers can do about this - it would require commit access to Sabayon’s overlay. There’s nothing much most users can do about this - The only suggestion I could make was “ask in #sabayon or use the package from the official tree”.

This is a simple, obvious example of a change that caused problems.

Quoting AllenJB's Post




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