Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The OLPC Linux Based Laptop Wins International Design Award

Filed under

Yesterday, the Linux based One Laptop Per Child was presented an INDEX: AWARD for winning the Community category. The INDEX: AWARD is presented every other year, and in addition to the glory, each award comes with a €100 000 prize. INDEX: AWARD operates with five categories, which refer to the context for which the designs are intended: body, home, work, play and community.

99 % of children in developing countries leave school without having touched a computer. Without a computer-literate population, developing countries will continue to struggle to compete in a rapidly evolving, global information economy. The One Laptop per Child (OLPC) foundation aims to provide every child in developing countries with a laptop, but given the resources that developing countries can reasonably allocate to education, the design team behind the XO, also known as the $100 laptop, had to create an affordable, yet technically advanced solution.

More Here

More in Tux Machines

What is a good IDE for R on Linux

If you have ever done some statistics, it is possible that you have encountered the language R. If you have not, I really recommend this open source programming language which is tailored for statistics and data mining. Coming from a coding background, you might be thrown off a bit by the syntax, but hopefully you will get seduced by the speed of its vector operations. In short, try it. And to do so, what better way to start with an IDE? R being a cross platform language, there are a bunch of good IDEs which make data analysis in R far more pleasurable. If you are very attached to a particular editor, there are also some very good plugins to turn that editor into a fully-fledged R IDE. Read more

Create your own desktop environment

What’s the best thing about Linux? Security, stability, performance or freedom? It does a cracking job in all of those areas, but another feature we’d highlight is its modularity. As an operating system deeply influenced by Unix, GNU/Linux is designed to be easy to pull apart – and, all being well, easy to put back together again. Major parts of the system are built up from smaller components that can be omitted or replaced, which is one of the reasons why we have so many different Linux distributions. Sure, this modularity adds complexity at times. But it also adds reliability, as components are designed to work independently, and if one crashes or suffers from some kind of bug, the other parts will (ideally) keep chugging along. So you can replace Bash with another shell, or switch to an alternative SSL library, or even replace your entire init system – as we’ve seen with the migration of major distros to Systemd. Read more

KDE Applications 15.08.2 Officially Released with Over 30 Fixes

The KDE Community has just announced that KDE Applications 15.08.2 has been released and is now available for download and testing. Read more

Linux Foundation and ONOS Partner on Open Source SDN and NFV Networks

ONOS, a carrier-grade open source software-defined networking (SDN) operating system, received a big endorsement this week from the Linux Foundation. Starting today, the two organizations will partner to develop open source SDN and NFV software. Read more Also: OPNFV Members Discuss Open Source NFV and SDN Plans, Achievements