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About Me

I saw somewhere that it was advisable to include an "About Me" page for sites and blogs in case someone wants to quote you or address you formally and it adds credibility.

So for those that don't yet know, I'm Susan Linton. I live in the great state of Tennessee in the southern US of A. I have a Bachelor of Science degree from Austin Peay State U, and a few credits towards my Masters. I've worked as a middle school teacher, substitute teacher, auto mechanic, factory technician, cashier, auto body sander, auto parts department manager, call center agent and waitress (when I was 13 years old) over the course of my life. I currently run and write for this website and write for other sites and publications.

I've been using computers since 1992 when I purchased my first machine with DOS on it. I later bought a machine with Windows 98 and in the fall of 2000 I switched permanently to Linux. First Mandrake, then Gentoo fulltime, but I've tested about every one out there at some point. I don't claim to be an expert, but I love Linux and open source software. I enjoy installing distros and sharing with others what I see.

I can be contacted at this email address.

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