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Linux administration will become GUI

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Linux

I am confident that the future of Linux server administration will rely less on the command line, and that most server admins will use a GUI interface. To understand why this will happen, lets take a look at the success of Windows servers.

Learn from history

Windows servers have always included a graphical user interface, and there is no indication that this will change. In fact, the popularity of Windows servers is largely due to the fact that server admins could manage their servers with the same interface they used on their desktop. Novell's Netware started out with a huge lead in the server market, but server admins started migrating to Windows because they were more comfortable with the interface.

Why should server admins need to learn two operating systems when they can just use Windows?

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re: Admin via GUI

lmao

Not sure what REAL WORLD experience lets you write such ridiculous statements, but in EVERY real IT shop I've ever worked with, CLI rules.

So much so, that even Microsoft is jumping on that bandwagon.

Here's a snip from Microsofts W2K8 page:

Server Core: Beginning with the Beta 2 release of Windows Server 2008, administrators can choose to install Windows Server with only the services required to perform the DHCP, DNS, file server, or domain controller roles. This new installation option will not install non-essential services and applications and will provide base server functionality without any extra overhead. While the Server Core installation option is a fully functioning mode of the operating system supporting one of the designate roles, it does not include the server graphic user interface (GUI). Because Server Core installations include only what is required for the designated roles, a Server Core installation will typically require less maintenance and fewer updates as there are fewer components to manage. In other words, since there are fewer programs and components installed and running on the server, there are fewer attack vectors exposed to the network, resulting in a reduced attack surface. If a security flaw or vulnerability is discovered in a component that is not installed, a patch is not required.

Windows PowerShell: A new command-line shell with over 130 tools and an integrated scripting language. It enables administrator to more easily control and securely automate routine system administration tasks, especially across multiple servers. Windows PowerShell does not require you to migrate your existing scripts, and it is ideally suited for automation of new Windows Server 2008 features. A new admin-focused scripting language, and consistent syntax and utilities, Windows PowerShell accelerates automation of system administration tasks—such as Active Directory, Terminal Server, and Internet Information Server (IIS) 7.0—and improves your organization's ability to address the unique system management problems of your environment.

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