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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: Debian

  • Debian LGBTIQA+
    I have a long overdue blog entry about what happened in recent times. People that follow my tweets did catch some things. Most noteworthy there was the Trans*Inter*Congress in Munich at the start of May. It was an absolute blast. I met so many nice and great people, talked and experienced so many great things there that I'm still having a great motivational push from it every time I think back. It was also the time when I realized that I in fact do have body dysphoria even though I thought I'm fine with my body in general: Being tall is a huge issue for me. Realizing that I have a huge issue (yes, pun intended) with my length was quite relieving, even though it doesn't make it go away. It's something that makes passing and transitioning for me harder. I'm well aware that there are tall women, and that there are dedicated shops for lengthy women, but that's not the only thing that I have trouble with. What bothers me most is what people read into tall people: that they are always someone they can lean on for comfort, that tall people are always considered to be self confident and standing up for themselves (another pun, I know ... my bad).
  • [GSOC] Week 8&9 Report
    This particular week has been tiresome as I did catch a cold ;). I did come back from Cape Town where debconf taking place. My arrival at Montreal was in the middle of the week, so this week is not plenty of news…
  • Debian on Jetson TK1
    I became interested in running Debian on NVIDIA's Tegra platform recently. NVIDIA is doing a great job getting support for Tegra upstream (u-boot, kernel, X.org and other projects). As part of ensuring good Debian support for Tegra, I wanted to install Debian on a Jetson TK1, a development board from NVIDIA based on the Tegra K1 chip (Tegra 124), a 32-bit ARM chip.
  • RC bugs 2016/01-29

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Wal-Mart Proves Open Source Is Big Business
  • Keeping the FCC and Open Source Happy
    The FCC is worried. You and they spend all this time and energy getting your radio certified, and then some bozo hacks in, changes how the radio works, and puts you out of spec. And so, back in early 2015, the FCC issued some guidelines or questions regarding WiFi devices – particularly home routers – in an effort to ensure that your radio isn’t hackable. The result has been that some router makers have simply locked down the platform so that it’s no longer possible to do after-market modifications, and this has caused an outcry by after-market modifiers. The reason why it’s an issue is that these open-source developers have used the platform for adding apps or other software that, presumably, have nothing to do with the radio. In an attempt to find the magic middle way, the prpl organization, headed by Imagination Technologies (IMG) and featuring the MIPS architecture, recently put out a proof of concept that they say gives both assurance to the FCC and freedom to open-source developers. Questions from the FCC
  • Wire open-sources messaging client, woos developers
    Communications startup Wire has open-sourced the full codebase for its Wire app, so it's easier for developers to build their own encrypted messaging clients. Wire open-sourced the rest of the client base that wasn't initially publicly available, including components related to the user interface, the web and native clients, and some internal developer tools. The company always planned to open-source the codebase, but didn't start out that way initially "because we were still working on other features," Alan Duric, co-founder and CTO of Wire, wrote in a Medium post.
  • TUG 2016 – Day 1 – Routers and Reading
  • OpenStack Pico and Questa set to Debut in 2017 and 2018.
    Members of the OpenStack Foundation have been voting on upcoming release names and the results are now in.
  • Partnerships Ensure That OpenStack's Future is Running Containers on Kubernetes
  • Open source & cloud computing
    Today’s interview is with David Egts, chief technologist, North America Public Sector at Red Hat. Red Hat has been around for twenty-five years and has hit over two billion on annual revenue. Topics range from open source to partnering with Microsoft to the up and coming DevNationFederal. In the federal government circles, Red Had made a big splash years ago by working with NASA to have incredibly fast systems. Red Hat has expanded so much in the past decade that the conversation with Egts didn’t even get to NASA.
  • Open source project on Facebook will allow you to design apps [Ed: React is NOT "open source", Facebook maintains or reserves rights to revoke licence from competition]
  • Austria awards 'Open Data Oscars'
    Last month, the Austrian State Secretary Muna Duzdar handed out the 'Oscars of the Open Data Community'. The awards were part of the 'open4data.at challenge 2016' organised earlier this year. The annual challenge aims to bring open data and ideas together in innovative and creative solutions.
  • Open data platform on Emilia-Romagna reconstruction
    After the two earthquakes that caused multiple casualties and widespread damage in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna in 2012, multiple programmes were launched to reconstruct the affected areas. To make these efforts more transparent, a team from the Gran Sasso Science Institute last week presented an Open Data platform that will provide all information on who is responsible, which company is doing what, and how the money is being spent. The 'Open Data Ricostruzione' initiative was presented last week at the Italian Festival of Participation. The platform will bring together all the numbers, figures and information on the reconstruction, and allow visitors to visualise, filter, track and map the available data. All information will be made available as open data, in the original database format as well as JSON.