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zfs vs xfs vs ext4

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This is my attempt to cut through the hype and uncertainty to find a storage subsystem that works. I compared XFS and EXT4 under Linux with ZFS under OpenSolaris. The machine is a 2200MHz Athlon 64 with 1GB of memory and 8 400GB disks attached to an Areca ARC-1220 SATA controller. Linux is 2.6.22.5 and OpenSolaris is 5.11 snv_70 "Nevada".

Aside from the different kernels and filesystems, I tested internal and external journal devices and software and hardware RAIDs. Software RAIDs are "raid-10 near2" with 6 disks on Linux. On Solaris the zpool is created with three mirrors of two disks each. Hardware RAIDs use the Areca's RAID-10 for both Linux and Solaris. Drive caches are disabled throughout, but the battery-backed cache on the controller is enabled when using hardware RAID. If an external journal is used, it is on a single disk with write caching disabled. The system is installed on the remaining disk, which is not involved in the testing.

XFS and ZFS filesystems were created with default parameters. EXT4 filesystems are created with -b 4096, to force 4096 block size when using the external journal. All filesystems were mounted with atime disabled. EXT4 is mounted with extents.

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