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KDE 3.4.2 Release Announcement

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KDE

The KDE Project today announced the immediate availability of KDE 3.4.2, a maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop for GNU/Linux and other UNIXes. KDE 3.4.2 ships with a basic desktop and fifteen other packages (PIM, administration, network, edutainment, utilities, multimedia, games, artwork, web development and more). KDE's award-winning tools and applications are available in 51 languages including a new Afrikaans language pack.

KDE, including all its libraries and its applications, is available for free under Open Source licenses. KDE can be obtained in source and numerous binary formats from http://download.kde.org and can also be obtained on CD-ROM or with any of the major GNU/Linux - UNIX systems shipping today.

Enhancements

KDE 3.4.2 is a maintenance release which provides corrections of problems reported using the KDE bug tracking system and greatly enhanced support for existing translations and new translations.

For a more detailed list of improvements since the KDE 3.4.1 release in May, please refer to the KDE 3.4.2 Changelog.

Additional information about the enhancements of the KDE 3.4.x release series is available in the KDE 3.4 Announcement.

Konstruct updated for 3.4.2

Konstruct is a build system which helps you install KDE releases and applications on your system. It downloads defined source tarballs, checks their integrity, decompresses, patches, configures, builds, and installs them. A complete KDE installation should be as easy as "cd meta/kde;make install". Optionally, you can install additional applications like KDevelop or KOffice (for example, "cd apps/office/koffice;make install").

Now installs KDE 3.4.2 and KOffice 1.4.1. Added KSystemLog 0.3.1, KTorrent 1.0 and Tellico 0.13.8. Updated all included other applications.

Link.

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