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Hackers Claim Crack of M$ Genuine Advantage Scan

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp. on Tuesday pushed its WGA program over the Internet, hoping to thwart users running illegal or pirated copies of Windows XP and Windows 2000.

However, online enthusiast sites reported on Thursday that the verification method had been broken in 24 hours.

According to one site, the hack is simply a short JavaScript string that is pasted into the address bar of Internet Explorer before users make a choice in one of the Windows Update screens.
WGA certifies that a user's system is running a genuine and legal copy.

This certification is now needed before users can receive non-security updates from Microsoft's Windows Update, Microsoft Update and Download Center sites.

The Windows Genuine Advantage program targets Windows XP Professional, Windows XP Home, Windows XP Tablet editions and Windows 2000 systems. According to Microsoft, about 80 million Microsoft Windows customers use these services monthly.

Examples of popular applications covered under the Genuine Advantage program include Windows Media Player, DirectX for gaming and the new Windows anti-spyware products.

Full Article.

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