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Make Room for Linux Apps

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Linux desktops are gaining in popularity. While it's still not too common to see shops replacing Windows desktops with their Linux counterparts, there is certainly an increased desire to interoperate.

That collaboration takes many forms. You might need to exchange data, such as Microsoft Office documents, with someone using an alternative office productivity suite. Perhaps there's a compelling Linux application you want to run on your Windows desktop. Even if you don't want the application to run on your Windows desktop, you may at least want to run it alongside your Windows desktop.

There are multiple ways to run Linux apps; the five most common are presented here. In most cases, you won't need to deploy all of these strategies. But, depending on your needs, you might need to deploy one or more of them. Here's a rundown of some ways to get Linux applications to your Windows users:

  • Use apps that are built to run on both platforms

  • Run Unix tools and commands on Windows
  • Remotely connect to a Linux machine
  • Emulate a Linux environment
  • Emulate a whole machine and run Linux inside it

Full Story.

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