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Black Duck Gains Access to SourceForge

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OSS

On Monday, Black Duck Software Inc., a leading provider of software compliance management solutions, and SourceForge.net, one of the world's largest open-source collaborative development sites, will announce that Black Duck will be able to use SourceForge's program repository to make its software compliance program more efficient.

SourceForge.net, a subsidiary of VA Software Corp., hosts more than 103,000 open-source projects, and has over 1,100,000 registered users using its resources to accelerate their own software development efforts. Black Duck will host a replicated version of the SourceForge.net software repository.

The software program collection will be used to provide users of Black Duck's protexIP software compliance management platform with the assurance that their in-house developments are being checked for possible license and IP (intellectual property) problems against SourceForge's enormous open-source program collection.

This deal is a follow-up to VA Software and Black Duck's earlier partnership. In that arrangement, the two companies announced an integrated product. This dual product brought together Black Duck's protexIP with and VA's SourceForge Enterprise Edition distributed development environment.

The protexIP system uses a knowledge base of "code prints" to uniquely identify programming code and its licensing information. This information is then used to validate whether companies are correctly using the open source code within their applications. When there's a problem, the program alerts developers and managers to possible license obligations and conflicts.

SourceForge, besides including open-source programs from many individuals and small groups, also includes software projects by NASA, Microsoft Corp., Google Inc., IBM and Salesforce.com.

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