Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gutsy Gibbon swinging along

Filed under
Ubuntu

There's a month to go before the next Ubuntu release, 7.10 aka Gutsy Gibbon, hits the download servers. A September 4 daily build shows a number of improvements over the 7.04 release which was named Feisty Fawn.

The 7.04 release was examined in April and there were plenty of reasons to be disappointed. The Gibbon has improved in several noticeable areas.

One must point out here that the PC on which the testing of 7.10 was conducted was built sometime in March; it's got mainly regulation hardware, nothing fancy. A Gigabyte integrated motherboard, two gig of RAM and an AMD64 dual core processor are the main bits. The emphasis was on functionality as far as the Ubuntu daily build is concerned. When Feisty was examined, the PC used was a much older one.

There is no change in the installation procedure but then this was already streamlined and efficient. There is a stage during the installation at which one can migrate accounts over from a Windows installation - if one exists on the PC in question.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews AJ Jordon of gplenforced.org

So basically Bradley Kuhn gave a talk at FOSDEM '17 about GPL enforcement and I was like, wow, it sucks how many companies and people think that enforcing the GPL is a bad idea. I mean, if you disagree with copyleft that's fine (though I personally would argue with that position), but then you should use a suitable license. Like MIT. The very idea that we shouldn't enforce the GPL just doesn't make sense to me because it suggests that the text of the license is watery and unimportant. I don't know about you, but when I say I want my programs to respect users' freedom, I mean it. So GPL enforcement is important. It seemed to me that there are probably a lot of developers out there who want to support GPL enforcement but don't have a good way to voice that support. gplenforced.org is essentially a quick and dirty hack I wrote to make that dead-simple. Read more

Red Hat General and Financial News

today's howtos