Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The free software journalism club

Filed under
Misc

After I posted yesterday's call for stories from or about people who claim to have had comment posts deleted from Groklaw, I received an email from Pamela Jones asking me why I was "doing this." Since such a question presumes a certain level of conspiracy, I replied that the call for stories is self-explanatory -- if what people have said is true, this is a significantly interesting story for my readers, many of whom (perhaps wrongly) consider Groklaw an impartial source.

The next email I got on the subject was from Ziff Davis Enterprise editor Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, accusing me of attacking Jones in a public forum (The Jem Report) via my call for stories, and advising me that this is not tolerable on his Internet Press Guild mailing list, of which I have been an active member for a few months. He then kicked me off the IPG list. It seems you aren't allowed to write about Steven J Vaughan-Nichols' friends, or question the operational practices of Web sites friendly to free software ideals, and remain an IPG member. This is a sad day for me, not because I am now an outcast -- on the contrary, that's the best part! -- but because a writer I'd held a great deal of professional respect for sacked me because -- I know this is bizarre -- I was being too much of a journalist. I am sad because I thought SJVN was a pillar of professional journalism, the sort of guy who would encourage a hard charger like me to chase important stories like this one. That Vaughan-Nichols would kick me from an unofficial online journalism group to pressure me into killing a story and to show support for his friend Pamela Jones is, to me, shocking and heartbreaking. Unfortunately, among journalists who are also members of the free software social/political movement, there are questions you are not allowed to ask, people you are not allowed to write about, and personal politics and cronyism trump professional obligation. So let's clear a few things up and air some dirty laundry, shall we?

More Here.




More in Tux Machines

IBM Promises Apache Spark for Linux on Z Systems

Expanding the z Systems ecosystem means data scientists can use Apache Spark’s common programming framework and get the full use of the mainframe’s advanced analytics capabilities - without having to get sidelined by any specific format for data. Read more

Red Hat augments presence in Malaysia

Senior director and general manager, ASEAN, Damien Wong Yok Weng said Malaysia was an important market for the company and it had much potential for the adoption of open source technology across industries. Speaking to reporters at the official announcement of the subsidiary here, Wong said in terms of expansion strategy, Red Hat had looked at all the surrounding factors in the information technology (IT) industry. Read more

An Everyday Linux User Review Of Android x86 - Release 4.4 r3

This review might not be very long but I have spent a long time playing and experimenting with Android x86 and if you stick with it and are willing to play with settings then you may get something close to desirable. Those who will get the most out of Android x86 will be using a computer with a touchscreen. Read more

Will an upgrade to Windows 10 on a dual-boot system mess GRUB up?

If the setup is on a computer with UEFI firmware, with the boot files of all systems on the EFI Boot Partition, then I don’t see anything that will mess GRUB up during or after upgrading to Windows 10. That’s because the EFI Boot Partition is like a public park, where the space occupied by each operating system’s boot files is respected. So the Windows 10 upgrade script will only update the files and directory that pertains to the Windows boot manager. That this is true has been verified by none other than a Microsoft employee in this blog post. The same goes with the upgrade script of the installed Linux distribution(s), but you knew that already. Read more