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Gentoo Developer Conference in San Francisco

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Gentoo

A full day Developer (and User) Conference will be held in conjunction with LinuxWorld Expo 2005 in San Francisco on August 12th.

The conference will feature presentations from members of the development team, as well as time for bug squashing, chit-chat, and key signing. If you will be in the bay area, seats are still available and advance registration is $10. Lunch will be included in the conference, along with a conference T-shirt. For those who can not make it in person, the event will be webcast.

More information can be found at http://devconference.gentoo.org

The event is sponsored by Global Netoptex Inc., a long time supporter of Gentoo's core infrastructure, and Indiana University, who will be providing webcast capabilities for the event.

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