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ECS, Hybrid Motherboards, Part 2

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Hardware
Reviews

After initially evaluating the board's layout and what ECS has in mind for its hybrid motherboard, I must say that the PF88 has limited potential. That potential may not be for the extreme overclockers or enthusiasts, but it's for the average system builder with slightly above average features in the BIOS. I am certain ECS won't completely degrade the quality or limit the extreme BIOS options of its "Extreme" line of motherboards with the PF88, so expecting a 100 percent disappointing enthusiast board wouldn't be true, or vice versa.

The board layout, as I mentioned earlier, is typically clean with no serious layout flaws. Although we would've preferred an active chipset cooler, hopefully the cooler performs decently enough to not require an immediate replacement. That said, I would rather not comment on its performance, since we don't have an evaluation unit of the board with us right now.

Some of the most attractive aspects of the board are ECS' promise to deliver an affordable solution that costs much less than its competition. Although I wouldn't believe ECS until I saw the board on retail shelves, I think the prices are quite attractive with the other two Extreme motherboards (Intel and AMD) that are currently available for purchase at charmingly appealing level. Of course, the reason for the competitive pricing is the use of SiS chipsets as opposed to the ones from Intel or NVIDIA that have proven to be the choice amongst enthusiasts. Interestingly enough, this particular board will support dual-core microprocessors from Intel and AMD in addition to other latest technologies such as DDR2 memory, socket-939, LGA775, SATA2 and much more.

Full Review.

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