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ALT: Linux from Russia

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Linux
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Russia may have bowed out of the Cold War, but with the release of ALT Linux Personal Desktop 4.0, Russia has become a contender in the Linux arms race. Equipped with KDE 3.5.7, OpenOffice.org, Firefox, a modern infrastructure, and good multimedia support, ALT Linux is a potential weapon of mass adoption.

ALT Linux is a Russian Linux distribution with several versions for differing needs. ALT Linux Ltd provides commercial support options for corporate customers, but also offers no-cost downloads of Personal Desktop for home and small office users. It is released under the Berne Convention for the Protecton of Literary and Artist Works, which reads very much like an open source license. It does include some proprietary drivers and binary programs that are still under the license they were originally released.

People may be leery of trying ALT Linux due to its Russian origins, but it has several language options available from the first screen in the F2 menu. Since that screen is in Russian, here's a tip: choose the fifth option, which means "other" but is used for English. This will change your screen and remaining experience to English.

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