Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

How Linux saved our Chinese bacon

Filed under
Linux

BEING A BIT OF A GEEK can surely bring you a bit of extra notice in some circles. The tee-shirt emblazoned with: "No, I will not fix your computer" is an example of the favour of such notice. Be that as it may, we are sometimes lured into lending a helping hand to our less technically inclined brethren from time to time.

Not so strange then when about this time last week, a local educator for one of the language programmes rang us up. She is a very nice sort to know, very clever, and always ready to lend a hand with anything. Time to return the favour.

Her IBM Stinkpad had gone to sing with the choir invisible. Would not boot from the HD. Would not boot from the external CD drive. It seemed sort of hopeless. She asked if she should choose "system restore" at the starting screen.

"No, no, no!" was our advice.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu MATE Donates Money to Tilda and Plank Projects

The Ubuntu MATE project receives donations from over the world, but the developers don't spend it all in one place. In fact, they also contribute to other projects and this month the two projects that received funds are Tilda and Plank. Read more

OpenBSD 5.7 highlights

The OpenBSD 5.7 release is still a month away, but the changes have been done for some time. The release page lists lots of changes, though certainly not all, and sometimes it’s hard to tell the big changes from the small changes. Annoying perhaps, but rewarding to someone who reads through the entire list looking for hidden gems. A few notes about changes I found personally interesting. Read more

Ubuntu 15.04 Switches to Linux Kernel 3.19.3

Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) is getting closer to the official release, which is scheduled for the end of this month. The developers have just upgraded the Linux kernel, and it looks like this might be the winning version. Read more

Hungary: open source key to Internet security

The use of open source and open standards is essential for a secure Internet, the Hungarian government says in a statement following a workshop with IT researchers and ICT service providers. This type of software will also reduce the cost of ICT and contribute to the country’s economy, says Tamas Deutsch. Read more