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Lucasarts and ILM powered by AMD

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Hardware

Digital effects house Industrial Light and Magic and game production company Lucasarts are sailing to the foot of the Golden Gate bridge to the new Letterman Digital Arts Center. In the new facility will be an AMD64-based data center housing a render farm to allow computers to process data 24 hours a day.

The new system will allow movie and game creators collaborate within the facility or anywhere in the world.

"There is a big expectation from our clients who come to us when they think they have something that can't be done," said Cliff Plumer, chief technology officer at Lucasfilm. "We chose AMD64 technology because it was the only enterprise-class solution with an easy migration path to 64-bit computing that allows our digital artists to break free from the creative limitations of traditional technology and continue advancing digital imagery to unprecedented heights."

The AMD64-based network will use the company's Opeteron processor for both 32-bit and 64-bit performance. One artist will now be able to perform multiple tasks that would have taken six to twelve artists in the past.

"As the processor innovator setting new quality standards, it's extremely important for us to work with the very best like Lucasfilm, the company that invented the visual effects industry," said Charlie Boswell, director of Digital Media and Entertainment at AMD. "It's simply impossible to replicate the ILM and LucasArts environment inside our laboratories as they continue to push the technology beyond what anyone thought was capable. What we learn by working closely with Lucasfilm makes AMD and our products better. One of the benefits that excites us most is that next-generation artists have access to the same AMD64 technology the top pros are using in their studios that is available at your local PC retailer."

Source.

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