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Mozilla Foundation Reorganization

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Moz/FF

On August 3rd, 2005, the Mozilla Foundation, a non-profit public benefit software development organization, launched a wholly owned subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation. The Mozilla Corporation is a taxable subsidiary that serves the non-profit, public benefit goals of its parent, the Mozilla Foundation, and will be responsible for product development, marketing and distribution of Mozilla products.

The creation of the Mozilla Corporation reflects the continuing evolution and success of the Mozilla project. The Mozilla Foundation was launched two years ago in recognition of the importance of maintaining the vitality of the Mozilla project and its technology. Since then the Mozilla Foundation has seen unprecedented success, with its flagship product Mozilla Firefox approaching a 10 percent share of worldwide Internet usage and surpassing 75 million downloads. Mozilla Firefox has struck a chord with consumers worldwide, advancing their experience on the Web and reinforcing the importance of maintaining an open Internet.

"The formation of the Mozilla Corporation gives the Mozilla Foundation new capabilities for becoming even more successful in delivering innovative open source end-user products," said Mitchell Baker, president of Mozilla Corporation. "The Mozilla Corporation is not a typical commercial entity. Rather, it is dedicated to the public benefit goal at the heart of the Mozilla project, which is to keep the Internet open and available to everyone."

The broad adoption of Mozilla Firefox has created significant economic value both in Firefox itself and in a commercial ecosystem that is developing around Firefox.

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