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Linux Mint Celena - Initial review

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Linux

Linux Mint is a user friendly variant of Ubuntu and many of its users refer to Linux Mint as "Ubuntu done right". Their website says that "Linux Mint's purpose is to produce an elegant, up to date and comfortable GNU/Linux desktop distribution". Wow, sounds impressive. Hence when the new version of Linux Mint, Celena, was released, I could not resist the temptation and decided to try Mint on my desktop. While the Mint iso torrent was downloading, I went ahead and read some of the reviews here and here. The jest of the two reviews is that Mint is Ubuntu made simple by including browser plugins, media codecs, support for DVD playback, Java and other essential non-OSS softwares.

This article will collate my initial experiences with Linux Mint, if I like it I might keep it for some days and do a full review in future.

The download was slick and the LiveCD booted to a very impressive looking desktop. The artwork was awesome, I was simply bowled over. However, an error popped up informing me that Linux Mint Menu has quit unexpectedly. I tried reloading, but to no avail.

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