Happy Birthday Linux Today, OpenSSH, and Google

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The first story wasn't even about Linux; it was about the release of Apache 1.3.2. Dave Whitinger posted that story at this time in the early morning of September 28, 1998 (Eastern time).

77,029 stories later, here we are. The most-widely read Linux and open source news digest in the world. Just about 80,000 visitors stop by on a daily basis to catch up on events and news in the Linux world, from all across the planet.
Whenever we hit this anniversary date, it is amazing to me how much LT means to so many people. There are days when it seems impossible to keep up with the feedback, good and bad.

It seems such a simple concept: gather a bunch of links together that point to stories that interest Linux users and observers. Post them at regular intervals throughout the day and night. Give people a place to discuss their thoughts and reactions to these stories.

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Also:

Today marks the 8th birthday of OpenSSH. Eight years ago today, Theo de Raadt made the first code commit to the OpenBSD repository for a new open source implementation of SSH client and server software. In the years since, OpenSSH has arguably become the single most used secure remote access software on the planet, deployed across pretty much every major operating system platform you can get. You can get a look at the growth of OpenSSH usage among SSH implementations across the Internet for yourself.

Happy Birthday, OpenSSH

And:

Google.com, a PageRank 10 homepage, turns 9 years old today, according to the special logo put up for the occasion (though many different days can be defined as Google’s birthday, and you may even consider Google to be as old as 12 years, depending where you put the “start” flag). To wrap up the history: Google started as a search engine, and it’s still a search engine today. Of course, it’s also trying to be much more today, in particular, an office suite processing information. But I’m sure we’ll see some more birthday logos before that turns to the kind of mainstream in which today’s market leaders are positioned. And we might see even more birthday logos pass by until Google truly understands information, but according to one of its co-founders, that’s where it’s headed.

Google Turns 9