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Review: Lunar Linux

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Linux
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Lunar Linux is an eye-opener, even for someone who has used many GNU/Linux distributions. It's based on the Source Mage distribution, but, as indicated on the project's Web site, Lunar Linux developers have rewritten both the install code and the package management code in an effort to increase its user-friendliness. A user-friendly source-based distribution? Yes, but as is the case with most new code, there are bugs to be worked out.

After downloading and burning the ISO, I booted from the CD into an installer unlike any I've seen. The installer takes you through a series of steps that are themselves divided into sections, using an ncurses-style interface. If you attempt to choose a step that has an unfinished prerequisite, the program will stop and inform you which step to choose next. It feels almost like a cross between the installers for Slackware and Fedora.

The install procedure's on-screen documentation is extensive and detailed. Although a page of text for each step may not be user-friendly to some, it certainly makes the install easier. However, there is absolutely no hardware detection. When given the option for installing a sound card, you are simply asked for the name of your sound card's module and given a text box in which to put it. To make matters worse, although I know the name of the module for my card, it failed to load properly and is not working to this day.

Full Review.

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