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Turning Your Printer Into A Paper Shredder

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Laser printers are infamous for shredding papers instead of printing them. But what about turning your printer into a high-volume paper shredder - on purpose?

The genesis of our project was the all-too-common "paper jam" ID10T error on a printer at a rapidly growing software firm that my good friend Mike owns. He also has a mountain of sensitive documents that seems to grow as quickly as his business, piling up next to his paper shredder.

Generally speaking, small business owners are not always technically inclined and are unaware that their laser printer can run too hot. After several attempts to use a new special plastic-based paper, feeding in sheet after sheet and not getting a single sheet returned, Mike then realized there might be a problem. Upon closer inspection several pages of this special paper had melted in the printer and completely destroyed it: The ultimate "paper" jam.

Full Article.

Way toooooo much time on their hands

Since you can get a much better shredder for $80 at Office Depot (probably less at Walmart) only people whose time is worthless would consider following the numerous steps detailed in the article.

re: too much time

teehee. I hear ya. Possibly needed a topic for an article. Big Grin

You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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