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1942: The Pacific Air War

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Gaming

Great games are timeless. I remember the first time I tried 1942: The Pacific Air war. The year was late 1994 or early 1995. I had a 486SX 25MHz with 4MB RAM. The game came in a big shiny box and had a big manual included. Once, they used to make great gaming manuals; they were practically books.

The installation package was 6 floppies. The game would not run without plenty of EMS, so I had to create a boot disk, which later proved quite useful for many other memory-intensive DOS games. After that came 486DX 33MHz with a whooping 8MB RAM. I could finally pimp up the details to high and still enjoy smooth graphics.

After that, Windows 95, Windows 98. I never abandoned the game. 13 years later, it is still the best combat simulator ever made.

These days, I use DOSBox to play the great oldies. 1942: The Pacific Air War runs quite well, with the exception of sound that sometimes stutters a bit, but it's exceptional fun regardless.

What is the game all about?

1942: The Pacific Air War tells the story of the American and Japanese pilots at the height of the WWII in the Pacific, pivoting around some of the most legendary campaigns of the time, like the Battle of Midway or the Marianas Turkey Shoot. You actually participate in the historical battles, as one of the many aviators who bled for their countries in the first modern naval war of all times.

The game is special, as it has several unique features that can't be found in any other simulation game.

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