Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Most Anticipated Release

openSUSE 10.3
45% (271 votes)
Mandriva 2008
13% (76 votes)
*Ubuntu 7.10
33% (196 votes)
Fedora 8
6% (35 votes)
Gentoo 2007.1
4% (25 votes)
Total votes: 603

Not enough options

Where's the "yawn" option? That would get my vote.

re: not enough options

Well, you could always cast your yawn towards the Unoobtu choice - basically it's the same thing.

Unoobtu?

Now, now. I've just been dealing with some techie types over a new website-to-be. I ended up blowing my stack when the flow of work was interrupted for the second time in about 10 days by one of them calling for a new round of navel-gazing which undercut the whole basis of the project. None of them had the slightest comprehension of the impracticality of that whole modus operandi.

Deadlines? Oh yes, they make such a pleasant sound as they rush by. Public relations? What's 'public'? Promotion? Who cares if no one uses it as long as it's theoretically correct.

In desperation over the most prominent Foss office suite, I'm turning to KOffice. Please wish me luck.

Asterick...

I'm assuming that Linux Mint 3.1 Celena goes under Ubuntu. Even though it's based on 7.04, not 7.10.

re: Asterick...

that's already out tho ain't it? but yeah, anything *buntu derived...

openSUSE 10.3

openSUSE 10.3 out this Thursday, woo!

Anticipated release

To Vonskippy;

Agreed

These seem to be a rehash of existing systems with software updates posing as OS upgrades.

Such is life when a rapidly maturing OS is so good that upgrades represent a "technological improvement".

Oh well, I'll live with the shame Smile .

Cabs61

re: anticipated release

Never has a list held less excitement. It'd be different if any of these releases weren't destined to be just as bug ridden as their predecessors. Apparently there's no glamor in fixing problems - just creating new ones (as long as they come with new artwork, I guess we're supposed to be happy).

Please don't start

For those of you who love your stability, and find nothing lacking in the same packages you've used for years now, you still have your Debian Sarge. Just use it, and be happy. Why bother to needlessly bash the dedicated developers trying to make Linux a bit more approachable to the non-software-purists of the world. You can still have your secret club meetings...

re: please don't start.

godsoe wrote:

"Why bother to needlessly bash the dedicated developers trying to make Linux a bit more approachable to the non-software-purists of the world."

It's called "FEEDBACK", perhaps you've heard of it. It's where rational, real-world people, give their valid opinions on what's lacking with Linux in an attempt to garner a workable alternative to Windows.

The idea is to create a very tiny possibility that the Linux developers will start paying attention to real users instead of the drooling unwashed hordes of linux fanboys (or worse yet, themselves) and stop churning out release after release of the same old kibble.

The 6 month cycle of churn has turned into a "look at our cool new graphics and see how fresh our package list is" instead of focusing on actually producing a better (or gasp - more stable) OS.

Debian has a slightly better release approach, but their software "politics" and lukewarm management (aka the blind leading the stupid) means it's a no go for me.

RHEL (and it's growing herd of clones) seems to be a good mix of stability, reasonably current packages, and good management (as does, or so I hear, SUSE Enterprise).

So get your bandaids out (and your excuse/apology thesaurus), and enjoy your bleeding edge eye candy release, just don't say that's the BEST that Linux can be (and we should be happy about that).

Re: Debian

I've been using Debian as my main desktop OS for about 4 years now (currently using the "testing" branch). Its package management system is both simple and powerful, it's arguably better than anything RPM-based, and its package pool is so large there's rarely a need to go outside of it. In other words, I'm very satisfied with it.

Nobody involved with Debian is stupid. They're 99.9% developers. IMHO they either a) don't give a flying **** about being, or Cool simply have no clue know how to be, responsive to the needs of a wide user base -- or c) a bit of both. (The latest example is the NZ time zone fracas -- how many Debian users even knew there was a "volatile" repository?)

That's what you get when a distro the size of Debian has hardly anyone on its staff except for developers. That's why Ubuntu's become so popular in such a short amount of time.

Contrast that with openSUSE. Looks to me like openSUSE did improve its underlying OS with its latest release (e.g. in the area of package management). Too bad it's now owned by Novell, whose marketing geniuses are sucking up to Microsoft.

re: re: Debian

Perhaps I used a bad choice of metaphor's - instead of saying their management is akin to "the blind leading the stupid" I might have more accurately portrayed their management style (or lack there of) as "two straight guys having a serious discussion about fashion".

As you point out, they seem to be either clueless or just don't care about managing a project that has grown beyond their initial vision/scope.

That's fine for a hobby, but in the business world it's grow, get bought out (or sued in oblivion), or die. I think Debian needs to figure out which category they're shooting for.

And although apt-get is a good package manager, their ongoing repo/dependency problems tarnishes an otherwise slick system.

re: re: re: Debian

vonskippy wrote:
That's fine for a hobby, but in the business world it's grow, get bought out (or sued in oblivion), or die. I think Debian needs to figure out which category they're shooting for.

In Debian's case, it's "none of the above." Unlike Red Hat, Canonical, or Novell, Debian isn't owned or produced by a business, and so its main motivation as an organization isn't making money, it's producing a free OS. (That's something I greatly admire about it.)

I think "hobby" is a bad word to describe something as sophisticated as Debian. It's demeaning, as if you're comparing it to a 7-year-old's train set. I'm just a home desktop user, but from what I read, Debian is entirely suitable for use in a business setting.

(On a philosophical note, I'd also disagree that businesses always need to "grow or die" -- change, certainly, but IMO once your income reaches a certain level, the idea of "continual growth" is more a matter of greed and the way our culture defines success. If you want your business to be publicly-owned and -traded, you always have to make more money; that's the way the system is set up. But going that route is a choice, not a necessity.)

vonskippy wrote:
And although apt-get is a good package manager, their ongoing repo/dependency problems tarnishes an otherwise slick system.

What repo/dependency problems?

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Leftovers: OSS

  • Communities of Communities: The Next Era of Open Source Software
    We are now about 20 years into the open source software era. You might think that open source simply means publishing the source code for something useful. While this is correct by definition, the most important component of any open source project is its community and how it works together. Open source projects are not isolated islands. In fact, it’s common for them to depend on each other. As new projects are created, it is also common that members come from related projects to work on something new. Apache Arrow is an example of a new project that worked across many related projects, creating a new community that from the beginning knew it needed to build a community of communities.
  • 9 Open Source Storage Solutions: A Perfect Solution To Store Your Precious Data
    Whatever business nature you have, there must be some precious data which you want to store in a secured place. Finding a right storage solution is always critical for business, especially for small and medium, but what if you get a perfect solution at no cost. There is no doubt that business cant runs without data, but while looking for a solution, you might need to spend a fortune to cover all your storage requirements. Open source tools come as the viable solution where you won’t spend money yet get a suitable solution to store your precious data. And don’t worry we will help you to find one of the best.
  • 15 Open Source Solutions To Setup Your Ecommerce Business
    In the past few years, there is a rapid growth in the online sales. According to a survey, more than 40% people are now shifted to online stores and majorly buying products from their smartphones and tablets. With the expeditious rise in the online marketplace, more business introducing online stores. For the big fishes in the industry, the expenses of setting up an online store is like spending peanuts, but for the small or startups, it appears to be a fortune. The smart move could be open source platforms, to begin with as they are not only free also reliable and scalable. One can set up the online store not only quickly as well as, in future if you want to add some of the functionalities, which are available with only premium, can be done by paying quite a small amount.
  • An Industry First: Teradata Debuts Open Source Kylo to Quickly Build, Manage Data Pipelines
  • MUA++ (or on to thunderbird)
  • OpenSSL Re-Licensing to Apache License v. 2.0

    The OpenSSL project, home of the world’s most popular SSL/TLS and cryptographic toolkit, is changing its license to the Apache License v2.0 (ASL v2). As part of this effort, the OpenSSL team launched a new website and has been working with various corporate collaborators to facilitate the re-licensing process.

Linux Graphics

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Still Hasn't Landed X.Org Server 1.19
    While the Ubuntu 17.04 final release is expected to happen in just over two weeks and the final freeze is quickly approaching, X.Org Server 1.19 has yet to land as anticipated into the Zesty Zapus.
  • NV_fill_rectangle Coming To Gallium3D/Nouveau
    Red Hat developer Lyude Paul is working on OpenGL NV_fill_rectangle support for Gallium3D and the Nouveau driver. Lyude has published a set of six patches for adding GL_NV_fill_rectangle support to Gallium3D and wires it up in the Nouveau NVC0 driver for GM200+ hardware.
  • New Engine Reset Capability Being Worked On For Intel DRM Linux Driver
    Intel's Michael Thierry published the fifth version of these patches on Friday. While there has been GPU reset support within the Intel DRM driver in case of hangs, this new engine-reset support is superior as it can reset a particular engine rather than performing a full GPU reset.
  • Vulkan 1.0.45 Released
    Version 1.0.45 is now the latest version of the Vulkan 1.0 specification.

Development News