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Chaintech VNF4 Ultra Zenith VE

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Hardware
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Introduction

Chaintech heralded the launch of the Chaintech VNF4 Ultra Zenith Value Edition motherboard in a company press release dated December 13, 2004. This motherboard features the nForce4 Ultra chipset, one PCI Express x16 slot, four 184-pin DDR DIMMs with capacity up to 4GB of memory, SATA II compatibility and the NVIDIA 7.1-channel audio solution.

Chaintech has introduced this particular Socket 939 nForce4 motherboard into the marketplace, as a value edition product. A check on Pricewatch showed pricing on this Chaintech VNF4 Ultra motherboard ranging from $90 to 118 dollars.

Something very noticeable about the Chaintech VNF4 Ultra Zenith Value Edition motherboard is readily apparent. The motherboard is sized below normal ATX standards and is sized at 305mm x 220mm. As a result of this slightly smaller board, some tradeoffs had to be made by Chaintech product engineers. Some of these tradeoffs will be discussed later on during this review.

Does this board provide the customer looking for value and performance what they are seeking? Please read the rest of this review for further benchmark results and discussion.

Full Review.

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