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Is TransGaming dumping Linux in favor of Apple?

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Software

The questions a company will not answer are always interesting. Recently I asked TransGaming if its seeming abandonment of its users who rely on Cedega to play World of Warcraft was merely an oversight, or if the company is too busy concentrating on its Mac projects to bother with Linux users. Almost two weeks ago, Blizzard Entertainment pushed through a required World of Warcraft patch that made the game unplayable for many Linux users, reducing frame rates to unacceptable levels, causing distorted sound, and making the OpenGL graphics engine more difficult to switch to. Considering TransGaming's history of rapidly addressing WoW patch issues, this is unusual behavior. Couple that with total silence from the company and you have a genuine mystery on your hands. What's going on at TransGaming?

Cedega subscribers pay U.S. $5.50 per month to get the latest updates to the game engine that allows many popular Windows games to run nicely in Linux (review here). If you stop paying, you can forever use the newest version you downloaded. However, with Cedega-breaking World of Warcraft patches coming out almost once per month, a Cedega subscription is practically a requirement for Linux WoW players. Traditionally, TransGaming has responded quickly to WoW patch issues and not only communicated its efforts via its Web site and user forum, but issued a game engine update that fixes the problem within a matter of days. This time around, though, TransGaming representatives have ignored the 2.2.0 patch problems and refused to respond to bug reports and forum posts related to these issues. When I sent TransGaming a press request email asking what was going on, I was not given the benefit of a reply.

It's possible that the WoW 2.2.0 patch has introduced huge problems that TransGaming programmers are having trouble fixing.

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