Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Is TransGaming dumping Linux in favor of Apple?

Filed under
Software

The questions a company will not answer are always interesting. Recently I asked TransGaming if its seeming abandonment of its users who rely on Cedega to play World of Warcraft was merely an oversight, or if the company is too busy concentrating on its Mac projects to bother with Linux users. Almost two weeks ago, Blizzard Entertainment pushed through a required World of Warcraft patch that made the game unplayable for many Linux users, reducing frame rates to unacceptable levels, causing distorted sound, and making the OpenGL graphics engine more difficult to switch to. Considering TransGaming's history of rapidly addressing WoW patch issues, this is unusual behavior. Couple that with total silence from the company and you have a genuine mystery on your hands. What's going on at TransGaming?

Cedega subscribers pay U.S. $5.50 per month to get the latest updates to the game engine that allows many popular Windows games to run nicely in Linux (review here). If you stop paying, you can forever use the newest version you downloaded. However, with Cedega-breaking World of Warcraft patches coming out almost once per month, a Cedega subscription is practically a requirement for Linux WoW players. Traditionally, TransGaming has responded quickly to WoW patch issues and not only communicated its efforts via its Web site and user forum, but issued a game engine update that fixes the problem within a matter of days. This time around, though, TransGaming representatives have ignored the 2.2.0 patch problems and refused to respond to bug reports and forum posts related to these issues. When I sent TransGaming a press request email asking what was going on, I was not given the benefit of a reply.

It's possible that the WoW 2.2.0 patch has introduced huge problems that TransGaming programmers are having trouble fixing.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Still running 32 bit Ubuntu?

I’m considering a proposal to have 16.04 LTS be the last release of Ubuntu with 32 bit images to run on 32 bit only machines (on x86 aka Intel/AMD only – this has no bearing on ARM). You would still be able to run 32 bit applications on 64 bit Ubuntu. Read more

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance

Since last month's Linux review of the GeForce GTX 980 as NVIDIA's newest high-end GPU powered by their Maxwell architecture, many Phoronix readers have been requesting Ubuntu Linux tests of the GTX 970 too. I've now got my hands on an EVGA GeForce GTX 970 and am putting it through its paces today. Read more

GTK+ Gains Experimental Overlay Scrollbars

The overlay scrollbar work that was committed on Monday is about improving the scrolling experience for those using GTK+ applications from touch screens. This prototype widget allows for showing a scroll position indicator on touch screens while hiding the scrollbar -- it sounds similar to Ubuntu's GTK2/GTK3 overlay scrollbar support for Unity. Read more

3 Alternatives to the Adobe PDF Reader on Linux

Adobe has pulled the plug on supporting its PDF reader app for Linux. This should come as no surprise, as the last time Adobe Reader for Linux was updated came in May 2013. But until recently, you could at least download and install Reader on your Linux desktop machine. Now? You can’t. If you go to the Adobe Reader site, you’ll find the Linux installer is no longer available. Read more