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NVIDIA GeForce 7800GTX + 1.0-7675 Driver Preview

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Within a few hours, NVIDIA is expected to release their new set of display drivers (1.0-7675). Among other improvements, these new drivers should correct a majority of the problems that previously plagued the 7800GTX Linux performance. Some such problems were the 2D/3D clock switch not operating properly and the GPU not being able to surpass the 415MHz mark. Although in our testing we were using an early build of the 1.0-7675 x86_64 drivers, we're pleased to say these issues are no longer a problem. The G70 immediately scaled up to 468MHz; past the 430MHz reference mark. This article is in continuation of our previous piece entitled the NVIDIA GeForce 7800GTX Linux Preview. The 6600GT and 7800GTX 1.0-7667 benchmark results were obtained from the previous article as no hardware or software changes had occurred to this testbed except for the driver upgrade. Below are the system components once again that we used during testing.

Hardware Components

Processor: AMD Athlon 64 3000+ (Winchester)
Motherboard: Tyan Tomcat K8E (S2865AG2NRF)
Memory: 2 x 512MB OCZ EL PC-3200 Titanium
Hard Drives: 160GB Western Digital SATA 7200RPM
Optical Drives: Lite-On 16x DVD-ROM & Lite-On 52x CD-RW
Add-On Devices: NetGear WAG311 802.11g & Chaintech AV-710
Case: Sytrin Nextherm ICS-8200
Power Supply: Sytrin 460W (ActivePFC)

Software Components

Operating System: FedoraCore4
Linux Kernel: 2.6.12-1.1398
GCC (GNU Compiler): 4.0.0
Xorg 6.8.2

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