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Is It Wrong to Love Microsoft?

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Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft is perhaps the most hated company in the history of business. Anointed with names such as the Redmond Giant, Microshaft, Microsloth, so on and so forth, the nicknames and jokes are perhaps exceeded only by the vengeance with which people hate it.

The question is why do they? I love Microsoft. Absolutely adore it and what's more, I hate Linux. I think it's the most over rated piece of software ever built and survives simply out of spite and not because it is terribly good at doing something because it is not!

What has Microsoft given us? It has given us Windows, sure, it was buggy earlier and a lot of things didn't work like they were supposed to (plug and play springs to mind) but it was a pioneering effort. No one was even close to the ease of use that Windows offered. Sure, Mac OS was a lot prettier but then it cost the moon and the stars along with both your arms and legs.

I understand the criticisms about the security of the software, the critical flaws and what not but again, we must look at things in the proper perspective. More than 95 pecent computers in the world use one form of Windows OS or another. The remaining being divided between Linux, MAC etc. now lets say MAC has 1 percent, does it make sense for a hacker to create a virus that can at best infect just 1 percent of the computers in the world? It doesn't, therefore you don't have as many security threats for other software as most of the people developing Linux probably sit at night writing up malicious code for windows!

In a nutshell, it's not so much as that the software is secure; it's simply that no one is interested in spending sleepless nights writing a virus that won't give them the satisfaction they get from causing havoc. Considering the fact that everyone who knows how to write two bits of code dreams of hitting windows with a virus, the guys at the "Redmond Giant" are doing a spectacular job.

Full Article.

Spectacular Job?

Such a spectacular job that my site suffers almost daily attacks in some form from mindless drones of zombied windows machines. I was so enraged yesterday I almost posted an ugly blog - but then thought better. Recently I even was trying to find a way to block all windows traffic from my site at all at the firewall level. (No feasible answer to that quest yet.) If M$ was doing such a spectacular job, why is this kind of thing still happening? (Rhetorical question really - Ignorant ass windows users not even knowing their machines are "owned" while M$ continues to release operating systems so easy to take over.)

This article just kinda pissed me off.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

OK, I want to twist this jerk's head off.

YOU"RE PISSED?

You should read the email I sent this a55Whole. In fact, if you look at it closely, there isn't an author named. It says "contributed by"

I called him on that AND the bit about having to hack the kernel and such nonesense in Linux. Geez, I thought I was a fud-meister. I tried to be as inflamatory as I could so as to provoke a response. I fully intend to publish it here if he sacks up and responds.

helios

LOL

Awe come srlinuxx and helios, don't hold back, tell us how you really feel. Smile
Sal

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