Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Educating the masses and squabbling at the distrotech

Once again the tide of time flowed and it’s been a while since I put pen to paper or in this case, fingers to keys. It’s been a rather busy and interesting time, apart from buying a house wrecking, furniture devouring, and hyperactive chewing monster in the form of West Highland Terrier that my wife named Kubuntu for unfathomable reasons. Yes, she does use it on her laptop, the distro not the mutt, but I veered away from the (how many letters in the alphabet?)ubuntu. I’m back with Fedora and how it fits my noggin quite nicely thank you very glad.

I recently replied to some comments on LinuxToday regarding PCLOS as a replacement for windows and I made a remark that’s really got me thinking. The remark was regarding the impartment of knowledge to what Linux is and what applications users’ can run and do with it. If people, and by people I mean non-Linux users, knew what it was, could see that their word, excel, PowerPoint documents could be used, that they could have an outlook type mail program, browse t’internet and chat over their usual channels, ICQ, MSN, Yahoo. I think that Linux uptake would greatly increase, possibly exponentially. Education of potential users has to be one of the keys to get it out and used by the masses. It worked with those annoying Mac ads, and as annoying as they were, they worked. According to one of the links I read here, OSX usage is up over 2%? Granted not a lot and it should be substantially more with all the vista paraphernalia going on.

The other key is probably more difficult to implement, a seamless integration into a Windows AD infrastructure. Most people will throw OpenLDAP into the pot here but step back a minute, you run the IT Dept. for a company with 50K+ users, all with XP desktops plugged into a colossal unyielding AD beastie monster. You have AD servers replicating across domains in every region of the world. It’s not going to be easy to get the resource and funding to replace and that is what you would need to do, replace the existing infrastructure. You wouldn’t even get funding to implement a test or pilot beside it, not without a very good sales pitch to the techno illiterate board. Plus, it is far easier to design on a clean sheet than it is to integrate. If Linux had this area sorted then the install rate would increase, guaranteed. It would be easier to sell at board level for the reasons all of us users know and love (and Mac ads tried to pick pocket). If the non-user board members where educated and aware of Linux (Mac ad style), then the sales monkey would have an easier job in pitching the goods and still have time to eat bananas instead of going bananas because he knows that it would save a vast fortune in the long run but he may as well be talking to the gorillas at Chester zoo. Personally, I think Sisyphus would prefer pushing his rock up the hill than try and sell a Linux idea to a board committee in today’s MS dominated corporate climate.

Then comes the matter of which distro will lead into it. Does it matter? I mean really, does it matter? Every day you read through the postings here or on any Linux related site and people are coming down on the poster because of the choice of distro. This is a bad one because… you should use this… you shouldn’t use that because the lead developer wore blue underpants on a Tuesday. Who cares, if it works for you then it works for you. Instead of flaming a review about somebody’s favourite distro, accept the opinion and move on, if your choice is worth writing about, write about it, don’t trample all over somebody that took the time and effort to write. The distro division is a huge, huge, huge (yes that huge), dividing factor. For a new user one review will give an opinion of the person that used it and there will be replies galore slating it. Now the user if confused, “why are there so many different ones?” The aim is to get Linux noticed by the masses and that isn’t going to happen with people squabbling over which has the better fonts or nicer icons. I mean come on! I was called gay on a posting where I mentioned I use Ubuntu. A few things wrong with that, 3 ex wives, 1 teenage wayward daughter and a very dented bank balance would prove otherwise. Gay? If I were I would be a lot better off and probably wouldn’t get as nagged for putting my feet on the coffee table whilst watching Scarface, knocking back a tinny or six with a 12” deep pan pepperoni, extra Jalapeños on order. But no, I’m afraid not. I’m too broke to be gay and my dress sense isn’t all that good. How someone could just throw that in the mix as a response still buggered me (pardon the pun).

Anyway back on course, would it matter if Novell, IBM, Red Hat, Ubuntu all threw money into a hat and ran a series of ads? A generic ad? An ad that instilled the basic principles with a few quick demos? The user doesn’t care what the operating system is, they are not installing it to use an operating system, they are installing it for the things they can install and run on it… can they use their word, excel, PowerPoint docs… how? Can they play their CDs? How? Can they watch a DVD from their collection? How? If all those names, IBM, Novell etc, were shown in an ad, people would have a lot more confidence to try and see. That’s all Linux needs them to do, try one. Any one. They are all united under the march of the penguin.

At the end of the day, no matter how many flags are flying for each distro, it doesn’t come down to the OS, it is knowing what you can with the tools that are available for it and these tools are available, more or less, across the board. Show any flashy Compiz’d desktop and the user wouldn’t care, show it with a word file open, dvd playing, email from mum or a picture being edited in GIMP, the one of the dog digging up the garden (RIP chrysanthemums, they served me well, hope they find a better life in the chew monsters belly) and you’ll have them on the line, reel them in and land them. A person doesn't buy XP just because it’s an operating system, they buy it for the things they can install and run on it. You don’t go down to Joe’s sound and vision and buy a cathode ray tube (ok, I know LCDs and Plasma out-sell them now!) you go to buy an entertainment box. What use would a TV be with nothing to show on it? And how can you have any pudding if you don’t eat your meat?

Now I know that maybe not all the facts are straight here, but this is a rushed lunchtime posting and if anyone can show me how to seamlessly integrate a Linux desktop into AD in 5 easy steps I am all ears and you my friend, will be showered in pints and pints of the black stuff (Guinness to the uneducated, and I do have vast Guinness experience).

Well that’s my tuppence worth over with. Time to shrink back into the realm of ER diagrams and trying not to drop bits salad into my keyboard (wife’s idea, the Guinness takes it toll and the mid life crisis and middle age spread isn’t helping much either).

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

using the wrong meauring stick

Part of the problem is that when referencing productivity, most people still use MS apps as their measuring stick.

For example, you say people want to know if they can use their excel and powerpoint files.

My point is, people want to use spreadsheets and word processors and presentation apps, etc. not specifically the MS variant.

That's why open standards are so important, then ALL apps can be evaluated equally, not just default to those who spend the most money or those who use questionable means to get their product used.

thats one very big stick

My point is that with such prolific use of the MS products people no longer refer to a word processor document, spreadsheet or presentation. The De Facto standard is, because of the integration among the masses, word, excel and PowerPoint. I build a lot of systems for a lot of people and never once been asked, "can I open my word processor document on that". I always, and I do mean always, get asked, "can I open my word documents", "can I use PowerPoint and excel". I would even go so far as to say that Outlook is now synonymous with reading email. If you plopped a MS user (90% of all users btw) in front of say, PCLOS, and asked them to create a word processing document the first words will be "where's word?"

If we were at the beginning and the MS products weren't used in such a widely accepted de facto standard then I would agree with you on the productivity tools generalisation but for now, for the average home user with a what? 90%+ MS use, they just want to know that they can read and edit their documents. They have never known any other products but the MS flavours and therefore a Word Processing Document to them is a word document and now every other word processing application will be called word. Does it matter what they call it? To instil the confidence needed to switch you need to show them that their files can be used. Once you have them over in OO or Symphony or whatever application or suite you tout to them they will be creating new documents and saving in open formats and as you say, the change will happen. It's just the initial conversion where they need hand holding with MS dummy (pacifier to you lot on the other side of the pond Smile ). It takes a long time to move perceptions and change de facto standards.

Of course, the change would be expedited if the corporate behemoths implemented the open source versions and more users were exposed to the various productivity suites but honestly, I can't see that happening en masse for quite some time.

When 90% of the users are still MS users what other measuring stick can you use? When talking about educating users, start with what they know then slowly educate them in using something else and knowing what the differences are.

Just one more point, doesn't matter if the business ethics are questionable or not, if you can get 90%+ of users on the planet using your products you've created a standard for yourself. It's big business, principles and ethics will keep you on the outside in the rain looking in and change doesn't happen overnight.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Clear Linux Has A Goal To Get 3x More Upstream Components In Their Distro
    For those concerned that running Clear Linux means less available packages/bundles than the likes of Debian, Arch Linux, and Fedora with their immense collection of packaged software, Clear has a goal this year of increasing their upstream components available on the distribution by three times. Intel Fellow Arjan van de Ven provided an update on their bundling state/changes for the distribution. In this update he shared that the Clear Linux team at Intel established a goal this year to have "three times more upstream components in the distro. That's a steep growth, and we want to do that with some basic direction and without reducing quality/etc. We have some folks figuring out what things are the most desired that we lack, so we can add those with most priority... but this is where again we more than welcome feedback."
  • The results from our past three Linux distro polls
    You might think this annual poll would be fairly similar from year to year, from what distros we list to how people answer, but the results are wildly different from year to year. (At the time of the creation of each poll, we pull the top 15 distributions according to DistroWatch over the past 12 months.) Last year, the total votes tallied in at 15,574! And the winner was PCLinuxOS with Ubuntu a close second. Another interesting point is that in 2018, there were 950 votes for "other" and 122 comments compared to this year with only 367 votes for "other" and 69 comments.
  • Fedora Strategy FAQ Part 3: What does this mean for Fedora releases?
    Fedora operating system releases are (largely) time-based activity where a new base operating system (kernel, libraries, compilers) is built and tested against our Editions for functionality. This provides a new source for solutions to be built on. The base operating systems may continue to be maintained on the current 13 month life cycle — or services that extend that period may be provided in the future. A solution is never obligated to build against all currently maintained bases.
  • How open data and tools can save lives during a disaster
    If you've lived through a major, natural disaster, you know that during the first few days you'll probably have to rely on a mental map, instead of using a smartphone as an extension of your brain. Where's the closest hospital with disaster care? What about shelters? Gas stations? And how many soft story buildings—with their propensity to collapse—will you have to zig-zag around to get there? Trying to answer these questions after moving back to earthquake-prone San Francisco is why I started the Resiliency Maps project. The idea is to store information about assets, resources, and hazards in a given geographical area in a map that you can download and print out. The project contributes to and is powered by OpenStreetMap (OSM), and the project's entire toolkit is open source, ensuring that the maps will be available to anyone who wants to use them.
  • Millions of websites threatened by highly critical code-execution bug in Drupal

    Drupal is the third most-widely used CMS behind WordPress and Joomla. With an estimated 3 percent to 4 percent of the world's billion-plus websites, that means Drupal runs tens of millions of sites. Critical flaws in any CMS are popular with hackers, because the vulnerabilities can be unleashed against large numbers of sites with a single, often-easy-to-write script.

  • Avoiding the coming IoT dystopia
    Bradley Kuhn works for the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) and part of what that organization does is to think about the problems that software freedom may encounter in the future. SFC worries about what will happen with the four freedoms as things change in the world. One of those changes is already upon us: the Internet of Things (IoT) has become quite popular, but it has many dangers, he said. Copyleft can help; his talk is meant to show how. It is still an open question in his mind whether the IoT is beneficial or not. But the "deep trouble" that we are in from IoT can be mitigated to some extent by copyleft licenses that are "regularly and fairly enforced". Copyleft is not the solution to all of the problems, all of the time—no idea, no matter how great, can be—but it can help with the dangers of IoT. That is what he hoped to convince attendees with his talk. A joke that he had seen at least three times at the conference (and certainly before that as well) is that the "S" in IoT stands for security. As everyone knows by now, the IoT is not about security. He pointed to some recent incidents, including IoT baby monitors that were compromised by attackers in order to verbally threaten the parents. This is "scary stuff", he said.

KDE: Slackware's Plasma5, KDE Community 'Riot' (Matrix), Kdenlive Call for Testers/Testing

  • [Slackware] Python3 update in -current results in rebuilt Plasma5 packages in ktown
    Pat decided to update the Python 3 to version 3.7.2. This update from 3.6 to 3.7 broke binary compatibility and a lot of packages needed to be rebuilt in -current. But you all saw the ChangeLog.txt entry of course. In my ‘ktown’ repository with Plasma5 packages, the same needed to happen. I have uploaded a set of recompiled packages already, so you can safely upgrade to the latest -current as long as you also upgrade to the latest ‘ktown’. Kudos to Pat for giving me advance warning so I could already start recompiling my own stuff before he uploaded his packages.
  • Alternatives to rioting
    The KDE Community has just announced the wider integration of Matrix instant messaging into its communications infrastructure. There are instructions on the KDE Community Wiki as well. So what’s the state of modern chat with KDE-FreeBSD? The web client works pretty well in Falkon, the default browser in a KDE Plasma session on FreeBSD. I don’t like leaving browsers open for long periods of time, so I looked at the available desktop clients. Porting Quaternion to FreeBSD was dead simple. No compile warnings, nothing, just an hour of doing some boilerplate-ish things, figuring out which Qt components are needed, and doing a bunch of test builds. So that client is now available from official FreeBSD ports. The GTK-based client Fractal was already ported, so there’s choices available for native-desktop applications over the browser or Electron experience.
  • Ready to test [Kdenlive]?
    If you followed Kdenlive’s activity these last years, you know that we dedicated all our energy into a major code refactoring. During this period, which is not the most exciting since our first goal was to simply restore all the stable version’s features, we were extremely lucky to see new people joining the core team, and investing a lot of time in the project. We are now considering to release the updated version in April, with KDE Applications 19.04. There are still a few rough edges and missing features (with many new ones added as well), but we think it now reached the point where it is possible to start working with it.

Preliminary Support Allows Linux KVM To Boot Xen HVM Guests

As one of the most interesting patch series sent over by an Oracle developer in quite a while at least on the virtualization front, a "request for comments" series was sent out on Wednesday that would enable the Linux Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) to be able to boot Xen HVM guests. The 39 patches touching surprisingly just over three thousand lines of code allow for Linux's KVM to run unmodified Xen HVM images as well as development/testing of Xen guests and Xen para-virtualized drivers. This approach is different from other efforts in the past of tighter Xen+KVM integration. Read more

Servers: Kubernetes, SUSE Enterprise Storage and Microsoft/SAP

  • Kubernetes and the Cloud
    One of the questions I get asked quite often by people who are just starting or are simply not used to the “new” way things are done in IT is, “What is the cloud?” This, I think, is something you get many different answers to depending on who you ask. I like to think of it this way: The cloud is a grouping of resources (compute, storage, network) that are available to be used in a manner that makes them both highly available and scalable, either up or down, as needed. If I have an issue with a resource, I need to be able to replace that resource quickly — and this is where containers come in. They are lightweight, can be started quickly, and allow us to focus a container on a single job. Containers are also replaceable. If I have a DB container, for instance, there can’t be anything about it that makes it “special” so that when it is replaced, I do not lose operational capability.
  • iSCSI made easy with SUSE Enterprise Storage
    As your data needs continue to expand, it’s important to have a storage solution that’s both scalable and easy to manage. That’s particularly true when you’re managing common gateway resources like iSCSI that provide interfaces to storage pools built in Ceph. In this white paper, you’ll see how to use the SUSE Enterprise Storage openATTIC management console to create RADOS block devices (RBDs), pools and iSCSI interfaces for use with Linux, Windows and VMware systems.
  • Useful Resources for deploying SAP Workloads on SUSE in Azure [Ed: SUSE never truly quit being a slave of Microsoft. It's paid to remain a slave.]
    SAP applications are a crucial part of your customer’s digital transformation, but with SAP’s move to SAP S/4HANA, this can also present a challenge.