Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Need for low-cost PCs helps Linux in India

Filed under
Linux

Aiming at India's volume PC market, two vendors this week launched entry-level products that run Linux and are priced at about US$230.

Backing these initiatives is the country's minister for communications and information technology, Dayanidhi Maran, whose aim is to increase PC penetration in the country.

Currently, 15 million people in India own a PC and there are 5 million Internet connections in the country, according to Maran. The aim of the Indian government is to increase the number of people owning a PC to 75 million and the number of Internet connections to 45 million by 2010. To achieve this objective, the country needs low-cost PCs, said Maran at a launch Monday in Chennai, commenting on a $230 PC from HCL Infosystems Ltd., a large PC vendor in Noida, near Delhi.

Maran also noted that the Indian government will be setting up an open-source center in Chennai to develop open-source software to get around the high cost of proprietary software, Maran said.

"The response that the HCL PC is getting is phenomenal," said Ravi Pradhan, country manager in India of Via Technologies Inc. in Taipei. At Indian Rupees 9990, the cost of the new Linux PC from HCL breaks the Rupees 10,000 price barrier that is important to attract the mass market, Pradhan added.

HCL's $230 PC uses a processor from Via in Taipei, while Xenitis Infotech Ltd. in Calcutta launched this week a PC priced also at about $230, which runs Linux on a processor from Intel Corp.

In May, Encore Software Ltd. in Bangalore introduced three models of Linux-based computers that retail at between $222 and $333 depending on the configuration.

Microsoft Corp. rolled out in India in June its Windows XP Starter Edition, a low-cost, stripped-down version of Windows XP for emerging economies. But some of Microsoft's partners, like HCL, are of the view that offering Linux is the only way to arrive at the $230 price point.

By using Microsoft's Windows XP Starter Edition, it was not possible for HCL to offer a PC at $230, said an HCL spokesman. "Linux is free, while the Starter Edition has a price tag to it," he added. HCL also offers PCs that run the Windows XP Starter Edition, as well as Linux PCs that run on Intel processors.

"The Starter Edition has its limitations, such as the hardware configuration that can be used and the number of applications that can be run at one time," said Pradhan. "The competition at the entry level is between Linux and a pirated version of the full version of Microsoft Windows."

By September, Via expects to introduce its Terra PC, a set of reference designs for low-cost PCs, that will first be rolled out in India. HCL is one of the licensees for these reference designs, based on Via's processors and chip sets, that will enable vendors to offer PCs priced at about $230, according to Pradhan.

The PCs will be offered with Linux, although they will be certified to also run Windows, according to Pradhan. By adding the Windows operating system and office suite from Microsoft, the price of the PCs will more than double, he added.

Microsoft expects that product value will, in the final analysis, prevail.

"We are committed to helping India bridge the digital divide, and making our offerings more affordable is a key initiative to this end," said a spokeswoman for Microsoft India. "In creating low cost products, we need to ensure that there is no compromise in the value they offer," she added.

By John Ribeiro
IDG News Service

More in Tux Machines

Linux/FOSS Events

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Session Lineup for ApacheCon(TM) Europe
  • OpenShift Commons Gathering event preview
    We're just two months out from the OpenShift Commons Gathering coming up on November 7, 2016 in Seattle, Washington, co-located with KubeCon and CloudNativeCon. OpenShift Origin is a distribution of Kubernetes optimized for continuous application development and multi-tenant deployment. Origin adds developer and operations-centric tools on top of Kubernetes to enable rapid application development, easy deployment and scaling, and long-term lifecycle maintenance for small and large teams. And we're excited to say, the 1.3 GA release of OpenShift Origin, which includes Kubernetes 1.3, is out the door! Hear more about the release from Lead Architect for OpenShift Origin, Clayton Coleman.

Security News

  • Report: Linux security must be upgraded to protect future tech
    The summit was used to expose a number of flaws in Linux's design that make it increasingly unsuitable to power modern devices. Linux is the operating system that runs most of the modern world. It is behind everything from web servers and supercomputers to mobile phones. Increasingly, it's also being used to run connected Internet of Things (IoT) devices, including products like cars and intelligent robots.
  • security things in Linux v4.6
    Hector Marco-Gisbert removed a long-standing limitation to mmap ASLR on 32-bit x86, where setting an unlimited stack (e.g. “ulimit -s unlimited“) would turn off mmap ASLR (which provided a way to bypass ASLR when executing setuid processes). Given that ASLR entropy can now be controlled directly (see the v4.5 post), and that the cases where this created an actual problem are very rare, means that if a system sees collisions between unlimited stack and mmap ASLR, they can just adjust the 32-bit ASLR entropy instead.

Raspberry Pi PIXEL and More Improvements

Trainline creates open source platform to help developers deploy apps and environments in AWS