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HIS X800XL vs Sapphire X800XL 512 MB

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If you are after a card with a good price vs performance ratio, the ATI X800XL is a good choice. Even though cards using it are $100 cheaper that the X850XT based cards, it still isn’t a cut down chip, and except for lower core and memory speeds, it has the same amount of pipelines and technical features as its bigger brother.

With tons of companies selling X800XL cards, it is obvious they try their hardest to find that special feature that makes their card special and buyable.

Today, I am testing two cards with different features. First we have the HIS X800XL. As other HIS cards I’ve reviewed, this comes with their IceQII cooling system, making it very silent. In the other corner, I have the Sapphire X800XL 512 MB, which, as you might figure out, comes with twice the memory of ordinary X800XL cards: 512 MB.

The HIS X800XL and the Sapphire X800XL 512 MB run at similar clockspeeds.

There are some differences however:

  • The Sapphire X800XL 512 MB has Video In as well as Video Out and thus has the Rage Theater chip. This chip is missing on the HIS x800XL card.

  • The Sapphire card needs extra power through a power connector
  • While the HIS has one VGA connector and one DVI connector the Sapphire card has two DVI connectors.
  • The Sapphire card comes with a standard ATI cooler while the HIS card uses the Arctic Cooling cooler.

Both cards however are dual-slot cards meaning you will have to make sure to have some extra room to the side of the PCI-E slot.

Full Review.

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