Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

HIS X800XL vs Sapphire X800XL 512 MB

Filed under

If you are after a card with a good price vs performance ratio, the ATI X800XL is a good choice. Even though cards using it are $100 cheaper that the X850XT based cards, it still isn’t a cut down chip, and except for lower core and memory speeds, it has the same amount of pipelines and technical features as its bigger brother.

With tons of companies selling X800XL cards, it is obvious they try their hardest to find that special feature that makes their card special and buyable.

Today, I am testing two cards with different features. First we have the HIS X800XL. As other HIS cards I’ve reviewed, this comes with their IceQII cooling system, making it very silent. In the other corner, I have the Sapphire X800XL 512 MB, which, as you might figure out, comes with twice the memory of ordinary X800XL cards: 512 MB.

The HIS X800XL and the Sapphire X800XL 512 MB run at similar clockspeeds.

There are some differences however:

  • The Sapphire X800XL 512 MB has Video In as well as Video Out and thus has the Rage Theater chip. This chip is missing on the HIS x800XL card.

  • The Sapphire card needs extra power through a power connector
  • While the HIS has one VGA connector and one DVI connector the Sapphire card has two DVI connectors.
  • The Sapphire card comes with a standard ATI cooler while the HIS card uses the Arctic Cooling cooler.

Both cards however are dual-slot cards meaning you will have to make sure to have some extra room to the side of the PCI-E slot.

Full Review.

More in Tux Machines

Software: KDE, DocKnot and More

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 10
    Today’s Usability & Productivity status is jam-packed with awesome stuff that I think you’re all really gonna love.
  • DocKnot 1.03
    This is the software that I use to generate documentation for my software. Currently, it just handles README,, and the top-level web page for the package.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Amarok Sees First Release in 3 Years
    The past 7 days have been pretty dang busy in Linux release land. We’ve taken a look at the best GNOME 3.28 features, recapped the latest Firefox 59 changes, and made ourselves comfortable with the latest changes to Linux audiobook player Cozy.

today's howtos/technical

Graphics: X.Org Foundation Board of Directors and Vulkan

  • Six Candidates Are Vying For This Year's X.Org Foundation Board
    There are six candidates running for this year's X.Org Foundation Board of Directors with four seats being open this election. Those six candidates for this year's X.Org elections include Eric Anholt (Broadcom), Robert Foss (Collabora), Bryce Harrington (Samsung), Keith Packard (HP), Laurent Pinchart (Ideas on Board), and Harry Wentland (AMD).
  • Vulkan 1.1.71 Released As The First Update To Vulkan 1.1
    The first point release to the Vulkan 1.1 release from earlier this month is now available. Vulkan 1.1 promoted a lot of functionality to core while also officially adding sub-groups and protected content support. This Vulkan 1.1.71 point release adds a new extension and fixes. This first point release to Vulkan 1.1 is officially version 1.1.71. This is because when Vulkan 1.1 was created, Khronos decided not to reset the patch number... Vulkan 1.1 was technically 1.1.70 and not 1.1.0. So now with this first update it's bumped to Vulkan 1.1.71.
  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Updated With Improvements For Sub-Groups & Multi-View
    The AMD developers working on their official cross-platform "AMDVLK" Vulkan driver have updated their open-source code-base for Linux users. On Friday the AMD developers pushed to the open-source repository their latest work, their first update since introducing Vulkan 1.1 support back on launch day earlier this month.

Programming: Google Opens Maps APIs, Survey, Firefox Addons and GCC

  • China's open source AI, a GitHub tool for licensing, and more news
  • Google Opens Maps APIs and World Becomes Dev Playground
    Google this week announced that it will open its Maps APIs to video game developers, which could result in far more realistic settings in augmented reality games. With access to real-time map updates and rich location data, developers will have many choices of settings for their games. The APIs will provide devs with what Google has described as a "living model of the world" to use as a foundation for game worlds. Developers will have access to more than 100 million 3D buildings, roads, landmarks and parks from more than 200 countries around the globe.
  • Developers dread Visual Basic 6, IBM Db2, SharePoint - survey
    Stack Overflow’s annual survey has revealed the tools and tech that developers love to hate: Visual Basic 6, IBM Db2 and SharePoint. According to the poll, which took in the views of more than 100,000 devs, Rust is the most loved programming language for the third year running. It is closely followed by Kotlin, which makes its debut in the survey. [...] At the other end of the spectrum is Visual Basic 6, which has been voted most dreaded programming language. Visual Basic 6 is also linked to lower pay, with Stack Overflow saying that devs using it are “paid less even given years of experience”.
  • [Firefox] March Add(on)ness: Momentum (2) vs Grammarly (3)
  • Intel SGX Enclave Support Added To GCC
    The latest feature addition to the GCC compiler this week is support for Intel's new "ENCLV". ENCLV is a new intrinsic that is part of the Intel Software Guard Extensions (SGX). The Enclave happens to be a trusted execution environment embedded into a process with isolated memory regions of Enclaves are protected areas of execution and the ENCLV instruction is needed to put application code into that special mode.