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PHASEX: A New Linux Softsynth

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Software

Development of native Linux audio plugins and softsynths may not be so relentlessly rapid as it is in the Windows and Mac sound software worlds, but new things do appear. This week I profile a cool new (well, relatively new) Linux softsynth, William Weston's Phase Harmonic Advanced Synthesis EXperiment, also known as Phasex.

Introducing Phasex

Phasex is a native Linux software synthesizer designed for use with the ALSA MIDI connectivity interface (a.k.a. the ALSA sequencer) and the JACK audio server. Its features include dynamic voice allocation (for polyphony), full parameter control via MIDI, feature-rich oscillators/LFOs/envelope generators, high-quality chorus and delay effects, and the ability to process the audio input from any other available JACK client.

I built and tested Phasex 0.11.1 on the most recent JAD and 64 Studio systems. I encountered no problems compiling the program, but if building from source isn't your idea of fun you can download RPM packages from the Phasex homepage. A package is also available for OpenSUSE 10.2. A packaged 64-bit Phasex is not available yet.

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