Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

March of the Penguin

Filed under

It's a bit like moving from the basement to the living room.

Open-source software, once primarily associated with computer operating systems, is now being used by companies for critical functions and software applications such as storing data, managing customers and analyzing business information.

The success of Linux, the free computer operating system created in the early 1990s by Linus Torvalds and developers around the world, has paved the way for a growing open-source ecosystem.

``The technology is evolving very rapidly,'' said Dan Kusnetzky, an analyst with research firm IDC.
As more than 10,000 software developers and other tech workers gather in San Francisco this week for the twice-a-year LinuxWorld Conference & Expo, the focus will be on this new era of open-source software.

Numerous Web sites, such as Google, are now operated on open-source software. Mozilla Firefox is an open-source Web browser that has been downloaded more than 75 million times. OpenOffice is a suite of desktop applications, including word processing and spreadsheet, popular in developing countries, such as India and Brazil.

A worldwide community of developers write and contribute to creating open-source software. That in turn can make the software cheaper and better than proprietary products, open-source advocates say, because the developers don't charge for it and collective brains are constantly improving it.

``It's a new avenue, in terms of technology,'' said Dave Rosenberg, LinuxWorld's conference director. ``They recognize if you can leverage this whole community aspect to development, it's a huge cost advantage.''

IDC forecasts that worldwide sales of open-source applications, tools and system software running on Linux -- while just a slice of overall software sales of more than $200 billion this year -- will increase from $5.4 billion in 2005 to nearly $17 billion in 2009.

``Organizations are looking for ways to cut costs,'' Kusnetzky said.

And in recent years, the open-source model has inspired a new breed of software applications company.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

FreeNAS 10 Enters Alpha, Brings Lots of New Technologies, Based on FreeBSD 10.2

FreeNAS' Jordan Hubbard was proud to announce the other day, October 8, the release and immediate availability for download of the first Alpha build of the upcoming FreeNAS open source Network Attached Storage (NAS) solution. Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets New Major Snapshot, Leap 42.1 RC1 Coming Next Week

On October 9, Douglas DeMaio wrote about the latest major snapshot released for the rolling-release edition of the openSUSE Linux operating system, Tumbleweed, which adds some of the latest software versions. Read more

Amazon’s AWS IoT platform taps three Linux SBCs

Amazon’s new “AWS IoT” cloud IoT platform offers Starter Kits built around Linux-ready SBCs like the BeagleBone Green, DragonBoard 410c, and Intel Edison. Amazon made its first big Internet of Things play by launching an IoT managed cloud platform for aggregating and processing IoT endpoint data, built around its Amazon Web Services (AWS) platform. Available now in beta form, AWS IoT, is being made available in the form of a series of AWS IoT Starter Kits, which bundle popular hacker boards with the AWS IoT Device SDK, and in some cases other hardware such as Grove sensors. Three of the 10 kits runs Linux, including kits for the DragonBoard 410c, BeagleBone Green, and Intel Edison (see farther below). Read more

KDBUS Continues Maturing, But Will We See It For Linux 4.4?

New KDBUS patches continue being published for this in-kernel IPC mechanism based on D-Bus, but it hasn't been communicated yet whether Linux 4.4 is the next target for hoping to mainline this controversial code. Just yesterday was a set of 44 patches in attempting to cleanup the KDBUS code further. There's also been an assortment of other KDBUS patches floating around the kernel mailing list. Read more