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Fedora Developer Interview: Chitlesh Goorah

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Linux
Interviews

After a lot of work during the Fedora 7 release cycle, it was made possible to re-spin Fedora to suit your needs, and although there were a few spins created during that release cycle, this time around we're seeing some really exciting uses of this feature. One of the coolest spins to be created is the Fedora Electronics Lab.

Read on for an interview with Chitlesh Goorah, the developer behind this feature - in which he discusses the help he had from the community, the target audience, his inspiration for creating this spin - along with some screenshots showing off some of the apps you can find on this spin...

To start, if you could tell us a bit about where the inspiration for this feature came from? Is it an area that hasn't been tackled by other distributions/OSs?

The inspiration for this feature came from HOW it got its name "Fedora Electronic Lab".

At the very beginning, there was neither the intention for a Fedora Electronic Lab nor its spin. During my post-graduate studies in Micro-Nano Electronic Engineering, I needed VLSI simulation tools. I started packaging the VLSI simulation tools for Fedora, which I needed for my studies. Then MirjamWaeckerlin and my lecturers in Strasbourg, France, encouraged the concept of introducing Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) Design Flows on Fedora, so that they can recommend to other students or use those tools themselves.

After receiving some feedback from the Fedora community, the objectives got wider...

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